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Wet-on-wet at the MAC

Certified Bob Ross Instructor John Blackmore, left and Bruce Stanton, one of Blackmore’s wet-on-wet technique students, were busy Monday hanging framed canvases made by students of all levels for a month long exhibition at the McMillan Arts Centre in Parksville.  - BRENDA GOUGH PHOTO
Certified Bob Ross Instructor John Blackmore, left and Bruce Stanton, one of Blackmore’s wet-on-wet technique students, were busy Monday hanging framed canvases made by students of all levels for a month long exhibition at the McMillan Arts Centre in Parksville.
— image credit: BRENDA GOUGH PHOTO

BRENDA GOUGH

NEWS Contributor

Some emerging artists are about to get the thrill of having their work featured in a local exhibition.

A new art exhibit at the McMillan Arts Centre (MAC) includes the works of first-time students as well as seasoned veterans of the wet-on-wet technique.

The exhibition includes the work of over 20 students of certified Bob Ross Instructor, John Blackmore and will be hanging on the walls at the MAC through the month of February.

Since 1995 Blackmore has conducted countless workshops and has introduced hundreds of individuals from the age of nine to 89 to the joy of painting using the age old technique wet-on-wet oil painting.

While Blackmore runs painting workshops all over Vancouver Island and the lower mainland, once a month, in an all day workshop held at the MAC in Parksville, Blackmore teaches the exact same methods and techniques as seen in Bob Ross’ The Joy of Painting T.V. series.

The wet-on-wet practice has become well known as the primary method of painting used by such television artists as Ross and although Ross passed away many years ago, his TV series remains the most popular art show on television in the world.

The wet-on-wet painting technique has helped introduce thousands of amateur painters to the art world. The techniques along with Blackmore’s experienced advice provide workshop attendees with the confidence they need to succeed.

The colourful landscapes on display clearly reflect the pride and success of the budding artists and Blackmore acknowledged the paintings produced by his students are remarkable.

“I have a feeling of pride looking at my student’s pieces.”

Ross didn’t generally sell his canvases and Blackmore admitted that many of his students are reluctant to put a price on their art work but he is hoping his latest batch of students will get the thrill of their first sale from the exhibition.

“I am hoping people will buy some of the student’s paintings.  A sale builds confidence and is part of the evolution of becoming an artist, he explained”

Blackmore said that having your art work hanging in a gallery adds another element to the piece and he predicts his students will be pleasantly surprised when they see their paintings in that context.

He said his 20 students will be on hand at the gala opening of the exhibition this Friday night to show off their painting with pride and the public is invited to view the display and meet the individual artists.

The art opening at the MAC is between 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. on Feb. 7 and is a free public event.

 

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