News

Broom busters

Gord Almond and David James pull broom at the side of the highway. - NEIL HORNER PHOTO
Gord Almond and David James pull broom at the side of the highway.
— image credit: NEIL HORNER PHOTO

Pulling invasive Scotch broom plants with heavy machinery may look impressive, but it could produce a bigger problem than it solves, says Gord Almond.

A volunteer with Broom Busters in Qualicum Beach, he said disturbing the soil with an earth mover is exactly what broom would want people to do.

"Winter is the time to pull very young broom out of the ground," Almond said as he worked with partner David James to pull immature broom plants by hand this week. "Pull young broom only. If you pull large broom, you will disturb the soil — which is just what broom wants.  Then you'll have hundreds of new broom plants."

Almond and James both live in Qualicum Beach.  Gord and David have been spending afternoons pulling out the small broom at the Qualicum Beach Interchange. They will return in May, when broom is in bloom.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

Hunters protest shift favouring non-residents
 
B.C.-only wines to come to some grocery stores
 
Deep Bay Marine Station — whale bones sold out
Charges laid in fatal hit-and-run
 
Farms devastated by flooding
 
Happy day: Elton John, David Furnish marry in England
2014 Sail Past a success
 
Regional District of Nanaimo repairs sewage pipe after storm
 
Coroner confirms body that of missing senior

Community Events, December 2014

Add an Event


Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Dec 16 edition online now. Browse the archives.