From left at Eat Fresh Urban Market with some local produce are manager Jerry Jaggers

Eat Fresh is saving water, buying locally

'People want to know where their food is coming from'

CARLI BERRY

news@pqbnews.com

Eat Fresh Urban Market has come up with a clever way to save water. Since their renovations last year, the market has added a water-collection tank that is buried underground, said Clayton Baker, owner of Urban Market.

Baker said the tank has only been empty once this year.

“We were out for, I’m guessing, a week and a half (this summer), when we finally got that rain and it filled right back up again.”

Baker said normally the roofs of the buildings are funneled into storm drains, but with his rooftops, the rain water is collected into a tank underground, where it is used to water the plants on the property and wash the sidewalks, when water restrictions are not in effect.

He said when the tank is full, water is then placed into storm drains, but the tank holds approximately 4,000 gallons.

Since Baker has been hand watering his plants, following the water restrictions, he said there is still water available in the tank.

“So we’re still making water go further.”

However the water will not be used on produce. “It’s purely for the gardens… any non-food related stuff,” he said.

Baker said that since he was already performing renovations on the building last summer, he thought that placing in a tank would be common sense.

“It was pretty easy,  I was (renovating) it to funnel all into one spot.”

He said when the tank is empty the store uses the city’s water supply, but they’ve only been on city water for watering once. “We have 7,500 square feet of roof — it fills up that tank pretty fast.”

Saving water isn’t the only thing Urban Market is doing for the community. Baker said he makes an effort to buy as much local produce as possible.

“I pulled a report off our computer in our produce department about a week and a half ago and out of the top 10 items, 8 were local. People love local,” he said.

He said the corn and garlic that Urban Market sells comes from Errington.

Baker also said that he goes to the slaughterhouses to ensure the animals are being treated fairly.

“People want to know where their food’s coming from,” he said.

Just Posted

Burning Thanksgiving question: Turkey or ham?

PQB notables also talk best side dishes

Jordie Lunn, world-renowned mountain biker from Parksville, dies in accident

The 36-year-old was with friends trail riding in Cabo San Lucas when the accident happened

Island man restores 1962 Qualicum Beach fire truck he bought for $1

Vintage vehicle in working order and ready to hit the road

VIDEO: Langley woman’s security camera records its own theft

Langley family discovers early morning grab was recorded

Map on Elections Canada website sends Nanaimo-Ladysmith voters to landfill

Address for polling station correct, but Google Map address differs

1/3 of Canadian men won’t share their feelings for fear of being ‘unmanly’: report

Fifty-nine per cent of men said society expects them to be ‘emotionally strong and not show weakness’

Share crash data, private insurers tell David Eby, ICBC

B.C. monopoly makes drivers retrieve their own records

B.C. VIEWS: Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou

B.C.’s largest herds turn the corner from extinction

Pearson nets shootout winner as Canucks clip Flyers 3-2

Vancouver picks up second straight home win

BC Children’s Hospital launches 2 new virtual care sites bringing total to 19 across province

Provincial initiative allows pediatric patients to see health specialists through video

‘Wham-bam out the door’: Surrey man’s front yard left ruined by scamming landscaper

Resident warns neighbours to be careful of door-to-door salesmen

Most Read