From left at Eat Fresh Urban Market with some local produce are manager Jerry Jaggers

Eat Fresh is saving water, buying locally

'People want to know where their food is coming from'

CARLI BERRY

news@pqbnews.com

Eat Fresh Urban Market has come up with a clever way to save water. Since their renovations last year, the market has added a water-collection tank that is buried underground, said Clayton Baker, owner of Urban Market.

Baker said the tank has only been empty once this year.

“We were out for, I’m guessing, a week and a half (this summer), when we finally got that rain and it filled right back up again.”

Baker said normally the roofs of the buildings are funneled into storm drains, but with his rooftops, the rain water is collected into a tank underground, where it is used to water the plants on the property and wash the sidewalks, when water restrictions are not in effect.

He said when the tank is full, water is then placed into storm drains, but the tank holds approximately 4,000 gallons.

Since Baker has been hand watering his plants, following the water restrictions, he said there is still water available in the tank.

“So we’re still making water go further.”

However the water will not be used on produce. “It’s purely for the gardens… any non-food related stuff,” he said.

Baker said that since he was already performing renovations on the building last summer, he thought that placing in a tank would be common sense.

“It was pretty easy,  I was (renovating) it to funnel all into one spot.”

He said when the tank is empty the store uses the city’s water supply, but they’ve only been on city water for watering once. “We have 7,500 square feet of roof — it fills up that tank pretty fast.”

Saving water isn’t the only thing Urban Market is doing for the community. Baker said he makes an effort to buy as much local produce as possible.

“I pulled a report off our computer in our produce department about a week and a half ago and out of the top 10 items, 8 were local. People love local,” he said.

He said the corn and garlic that Urban Market sells comes from Errington.

Baker also said that he goes to the slaughterhouses to ensure the animals are being treated fairly.

“People want to know where their food’s coming from,” he said.

Just Posted

Nanoose Bay traffic update: paving postponed but closure extended on Northwest Bay Road

Mainroad Contracting halts paving while City of Parksville waits on contractors

Group aims to preserve French Creek tree

Save Estuary Land Society says bald eagles used tree for nest

Farewell to Parksville Beach Festival for 2019

People’s Choice Awards tallied, organizers report another successful year

Oceanside RCMP officer makes Alexa’s Team

Munro able to stop and process 15 impaired motorists during the past year

Oceanside Generals boost arsenal for coming VIJHL season

Coach Lemmon gets a good look at players at main camp

Clean the house, prep for your next trip: Tips to nix the post-vacation blues

48 per cent of travellers are already stressed about ‘normal life’ while still on their trip

Vancouver Island senior found safe with help from six search and rescue teams

Wayne Strilesky found safe in thick brush in north Nanaimo

More women may need breast cancer gene test, U.S. guidelines say

Recommendations aimed at women who’ve been treated for BRCA-related cancers and are now cancer-free

Couple could go to jail for taking 88 lbs. of Italian sand

Pair said they didn’t know it was illegal to take the sand, which is protected as a public good

Bodies of two missing Surrey men found near Ashcroft: RCMP

Ryan Provencher and Richard Scurr have been missing since July 17

Hearings begin as Vancouver Island mom fights for allegedly abducted daughter

Tasha Brown now in Jersey in the British Isles, fundraiser being held in Nanaimo

B.C. manhunt suspects left cellphone video before they died: family

Family member says Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky recorded final wishes

Most Read