From left at Eat Fresh Urban Market with some local produce are manager Jerry Jaggers

Eat Fresh is saving water, buying locally

'People want to know where their food is coming from'

CARLI BERRY

news@pqbnews.com

Eat Fresh Urban Market has come up with a clever way to save water. Since their renovations last year, the market has added a water-collection tank that is buried underground, said Clayton Baker, owner of Urban Market.

Baker said the tank has only been empty once this year.

“We were out for, I’m guessing, a week and a half (this summer), when we finally got that rain and it filled right back up again.”

Baker said normally the roofs of the buildings are funneled into storm drains, but with his rooftops, the rain water is collected into a tank underground, where it is used to water the plants on the property and wash the sidewalks, when water restrictions are not in effect.

He said when the tank is full, water is then placed into storm drains, but the tank holds approximately 4,000 gallons.

Since Baker has been hand watering his plants, following the water restrictions, he said there is still water available in the tank.

“So we’re still making water go further.”

However the water will not be used on produce. “It’s purely for the gardens… any non-food related stuff,” he said.

Baker said that since he was already performing renovations on the building last summer, he thought that placing in a tank would be common sense.

“It was pretty easy,  I was (renovating) it to funnel all into one spot.”

He said when the tank is empty the store uses the city’s water supply, but they’ve only been on city water for watering once. “We have 7,500 square feet of roof — it fills up that tank pretty fast.”

Saving water isn’t the only thing Urban Market is doing for the community. Baker said he makes an effort to buy as much local produce as possible.

“I pulled a report off our computer in our produce department about a week and a half ago and out of the top 10 items, 8 were local. People love local,” he said.

He said the corn and garlic that Urban Market sells comes from Errington.

Baker also said that he goes to the slaughterhouses to ensure the animals are being treated fairly.

“People want to know where their food’s coming from,” he said.

Just Posted

Two nature-inspired artists display oil paintings at Qualicum gallery

Judy Maxwell and Lloyd Major depict scenes of wildlife, landscapes and the west coast

Parksville seniors getting stronger with age

Weightlifting couple qualify to compete at Worlds Masters in Montreal in August

Camera captures cougar lurking in Parksville’s Foster Park neighbourhood

Resident shared photo to alert others to big cat’s presence

VIDEO: RCMP ask kids to help name soon-to-be police dogs

13 German shepherd puppies will be born this year

BC Ferries has no plans to implement debit for vehicle ticket payments

Debit accepted for foot passengers, on-board purchases for all vessels

‘The whole city has changed:’ B.C. woman in New Zealand reacts to mosque attacks

An expatriate and Muslim students at UBC Okanagan deeply affected by white supremacist shooting

Trudeau condemns hateful, ‘toxic segments’ of society after New Zealand shooting

Prime Minister expressed sorrow at the many attacks in recent years

Air Canada grounds its Boeing Max 8s until at least July 1 to provide certainty

Airlines around the world have been working to redeploy their fleets since their Max 8s were grounded last week

Budget to tout Liberal economic record, provide distraction from SNC furor

This is the Liberal government’s fourth and final budget before the election

Vancouver Island overdue for the big one, can also expect mega-thrust tsunami

The last big earthquake was 70 years ago in Courtenay

Horvat scores 16 seconds into OT as Canucks beat Blackhawks 3-2

Pettersson sets rookie scoring record for Vancouver

Vancouver Island cancer survivor not giving up fight

Kim Angell grows from advocate and blogger to the face of national campaign

Most Read