Canadian annual inflation rose by two per cent in July to hit the Bank of Canada’s ideal target for a second straight month. The latest consumer price index found higher costs, year-over-year, for auto insurance, mortgage interest and fresh vegetables. A real estate sold sign hangs in front of a west-end Toronto property Friday, Nov. 4, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

Inflation hits Bank of Canada 2% target for second straight month

Prices showed strength in other areas, including an 18.9 per cent increase in the cost of fresh vegetables

Canadian annual inflation came in at two per cent in July to hit the Bank of Canada’s ideal target for a second straight month.

Compared with a year earlier, consumers paid less last month for gasoline, internet services and traveller accommodation, Statistics Canada said Wednesday.

Prices showed strength in other areas, including an 18.9 per cent increase in the cost of fresh vegetables compared to the previous year. The consumer price index also found higher costs, year-over-year, for auto insurance, mortgage interest and passenger vehicles.

The average of Canada’s three gauges for core inflation, which are considered better measures of underlying price pressures by excluding volatile items, was also close to the central bank’s target at 2.03 per cent. It was up slightly from a revised reading of two per cent in June.

On their own, the headline and core numbers don’t put immediate pressure on the inflation-targeting Bank of Canada to adjust interest rates. The central bank can move the interest rate as a tool to try and promote or cool off inflation.

READ MORE: Lower gas prices slow annual inflation rate to Bank of Canada’s 2% bull’s-eye

But with weakening global economic conditions related to the U.S.-China trade war some economists now expect governor Stephen Poloz to cut interest rates this fall — and perhaps as early as September.

The Canadian economy has continued to perform well despite mounting concerns about the global outlook.

A closer look at the inflation data for July, shows gas prices had less of a year-over-year fall than the previous month’s report. The smaller drop applied more upward pressure on the headline number as consumers paid more for gas in July compared with June.

By omitting pump prices, the agency said last month’s overall annual inflation number was 2.4 per cent.

Prices, the report said, increased in all eight of its major categories compared with a year earlier. However, annual price pressures in the services index slowed last month to 2.4 per cent, down from 2.8 per cent.

By region, consumer prices slowed the most in Manitoba and British Columbia, the report said. Statistics Canada attributed the deceleration in Manitoba to the July 1 drop in the province’s retail sales tax.

On a month-to-month basis, the agency said consumers paid 2.5 per cent less for telephone services in July compared with June. The drop followed pricing changes across the industry as wireless companies faced tougher competition.

The agency said the decrease in phone plan costs was offset somewhat by higher price tags on devices like smartphones and tablets. From June to July, the price of these devices rose 42.5 per cent.

Andy Blatchford, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

PQB crime report: Thieves pilfer fuel from vehicles

Oceanside RCMP receive 229 complaints in one-week period

Nanaimo, Royal Jubilee to be Vancouver Island’s COVID-19 frontline hospitals

Other Island hospitals will be admitting COVID-19 patients and will be used in a support role

COVID-19: Parksville bylaw officers to enforce provincial health orders

Residents will be reminded to social distance and stay off playgrounds

Petition against development of wetlands area in Qualicum Beach garners nearly 2,000 signatures

Preservation society: ’We believe this is a violation of the town’s bylaws’

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Easter Bunny not a COVID-19 carrier, allowed to do drop offs

World Health Organization grants permission to Bunny as he cannot transfer the virus

Mid-Island Panago locations offer free pizza to first responders

First responder can get free pizza at Panago in Parksville, Nanaimo, Ladysmith, Duncan, and Mill Bay

Nanaimo man, allegedly drunk and high, arrested after climbing 100-foot tree

Man in sandals climbs fir tree, hurls obscenities at police below

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

COVID-19 PQB business update: looking for takeout food?

Email messages to editor@pqbnews.com

Most Read