Health Minister Adrian Dix (Black Press)

Inspection reports to be released for B.C. child care, senior facilities

Health Minister Adrian Dix says unlicensed operators will also be forced to disclose conditions

The B.C. government intends to force licensed and unlicensed child care, senior care and other care facilities to identify themselves and their inspection results.

Health Minister Adrian Dix presented legislation Tuesday to tighten up reporting rules for care home operators, including those for people with developmental disabilities, mental health and substance abuse disorders and brain injuries.

“The proposed legislation would amend the [Community Care and Assisted Living Act] to require the posting online about community care facilities and assisted living residences, including persons operating without a licence or registration, in contravention of the act,” Dix told the B.C. legislature.

“The information will have to be posted on the websites of the health authorities, with respect to community care facilities, and on the website of the Ministry of Health with respect to assisted living residences.”

Children and Family Development Minister Katrine Conroy said the changes will allow informal child care to continue, because it is needed.

“Right now there are a number of people in the province who provide care to a couple of kids, an auntie down the street, a grandma, and we need to ensure that that can still happen,” Conroy said. “There are unlicensed care [operators] that are registered with the child care resource and referral program, so they ensure that those caregivers have first aid, that they have good facilities to provide the care.”

The province has issued a fact sheet showing the changes, showing that “illegal residential” care facilities will have to have summary inspection reports completed and posted for five years.

Conroy said the recent provincial budget includes more than $2 million to hire additional inspectors to broaden the work to include the “illegal residential” facilities.

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