A new poll by Insights West examines public opinion on the recent PR war between the federal government and the wireless phone industry.

A new poll by Insights West examines public opinion on the recent PR war between the federal government and the wireless phone industry.

Poll points to stalemate in wireless phone war, appetite for more competition

Insights West finds B.C. customers don't see federal government or telcos are their champion

Seventy one per cent of B.C. residents say there’s not enough competition in Canada’s wireless phone industry, according to a new poll.

The online survey by Insights West found only 12 per cent think there’s enough competition and five per cent say there’s too much.

Roughly four in five B.C. residents agree that Canadians pay some of the highest wireless rates in the developed world, that it’s unfair for three big phone companies to control most of the industry and that it’s important for Canada to add a fourth major player to inject competition.

But the poll found fewer respondents – 49 per cent – convinced that the new entrant should be a large foreign wireless firm.

The federal government has attempted to woo a new major foreign player to Canada but U.S. mobile giant Verizon ruled out such a move over the summer.

Forty three per cent agreed with the federal government’s assertion that consumers have more wireless choice now than a year ago.

Insights West vice-president Mario Canseco said the findings point to a stalemate in the ongoing public relations battle between the federal government and the big three telcos over wireless policy reform.

The poll found 21 per cent say the federal government has the best interest of customers in mind, just 10 per cent named the wireless industry and 69 per cent don’t regard either as their champion.

“The appetite for more competition in the wireless industry is substantial, but few British Columbians are looking at the federal government as the saviour of consumers,” Canseco said. “There is no outright winner in this conflict, as most residents cannot select either of the two opponents as the one that will defend their interests.”

For more on the poll see insightswest.com.

 

 

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