The Strate Scapes Landscaping truck and the Pilon Tools truck sit side-by-side, waiting to head out to the Comox Valley. Photo submitted.

Beloved lighted truck parade returns to the Comox Valley

RCMP reverse stance that forced the cancellation of last year’s tour

A Christmas tradition resumes in the Comox Valley this year, after a brief law-enforced interruption.

The much-loved Comox Valley Christmas Light Trucks will be driving through Comox Valley neighbourhoods this season, after coming to an agreement with Comox Valley RCMP.

The small convoy of trucks, led by a Strate Scapes Landscaping dump truck, drives through the residential areas of the Comox Valley, completely decked out in festive lighting. In addition to touring residential neighbourhoods, the convoy visits care homes, and other homes where people may be confined due to illness or disability, to spread Christmas cheer and to collect donations for charities.

The tradition, which began in 2013, was halted midway through the 2017 Christmas season, when Comox Valley RCMP issued a warning to two drivers, saying the Christmas lights violated the Motor Vehicle Act and could be distracting for drivers.

READ: Festive trucks sidelined by police

Erin Kaetler and her husband own Strate Scapes Landscaping 2012 Ltd., the company that started the neighbourhood tour. After the incident last year, Kaetler approached local councils with letters, asking to help them reach a compromise. Despite the effort, the RCMP stood firm on its decision.

READ ALSO: Police won’t waver on stance regarding lighted trucks

Knowing that Insp. Tim Walton had been replaced over the summer, Kaetler called the Comox Valley RCMP detachment on Nov. 17 to see if an arrangement could be made to resume the tradition this year. Her persistence paid off.

“I thought ‘I reached out once and it backfired but I’m going to try this again, because it’s a new fellow. I’m guessing they were probably pretty shocked and embarrassed about how bad it got last year, with the publicity. I don’t think they expected such a [backlash]. I was pretty certain [new detachment commander, Insp. Kurvers] would want things to be different.”

She was right.

“I just phoned and left Inspector Kurvers a voicemail, saying I was hoping to chat with him, and he called me back,” she said. “I have to give credit to Corporal Tori Cliffe. I guess as soon as Inspector Kurvers came in, one of the things they talked about was what had happened last Christmas, and the communication problem.”

After Kurvers spoke with Kaetler, he spoke again with Cliffe, who then called Kaetler a couple of days later, with the good news.

“She told me they had spoken, and were really supportive, and glad that I had called, and they were excited … to work things out and have it be very much different than what happened last year.

“They basically said they don’t see any problem with it, as long as we keep the lights off while we are travelling on the main roads.”

The “season” officially kicks off at the Campbell River Truck Parade next Friday, followed by the Cumberland Truck Parade Saturday.

After that, the convoy starts touring the Comox Valley.

The schedule is posted daily on Comox Valley Christmas Lights Trucks Facebook page.

“We try to figure out every day where we want to go, then we post it. We will make a couple of appearances at the Crown Isle festivities, then head into the neighbourhoods.”

There is a fundraising angle to the tour as well. The drivers collect donations for the food bank as they cruise through the neighbourhoods. Simply listen for the horns, then meet them at the curb.

“Last year we had a whole enclosed trailer full of food in the back of a pick-up truck and a few hundred dollars,” said Kaetler. “People were really supportive.”

Kaetler said there were never any hard feelings from her family’s company regarding last year’s decision, but she is grateful to the RCMP for changing its position.

“We all respect the police and know they have a job to do,” she said. “Just because we don’t agree with a decision doesn’t mean it’s worthy of disrespect. I have a brother who is an RCMP officer, and we do respect what they do. We may not have agreed with their decision, and didn’t care for the way it was handled, but in the end, it’s all about keeping things respectful. We are just happy to have a new opportunity, with somebody else in charge, who has a different view of working with the community.”

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