Julio Cochoy of The Maya Skills Project shows off some of the jewelry at the World Craft Bazaar at Knox United Church last year. This year, the bazaar is on again at Knox on Nov. 4. — Lauren Collins photo

World Craft Bazaar coming up in Parksville

Event features fair-trade vendors with products from around the globe

The 17th Annual KAIROS World Craft Bazaar takes place Saturday, Nov. 4 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Knox United Church.

This is a chance to purchase “gifts that give twice” (that is, to the recipient and to the charitable endeavour).

Again this year Small World Imports will have its carpets made in Tibet by villagers working to preserve ancient traditional arts. As usual, there are 20 vendors who support fair trade and other ethical pursuits. Participants from around Vancouver Island, and some from the mainland, come to display and sell their products that make intriguing choices for gifts or for personal use.

Fair Trade teas, coffees, spices, chocolate and olive oil will be offered. For the person who has everything, living gifts such as goats, chickens, and pigs can be purchased on their behalf for a poor family in Guatemala.

Local vendors include Aldea Maya, Mayan Families, Mystic Lotus, Kenya Education Endowment Fund and UR Building Knowledge.

Longtime favorites are Ten Thousand Villages, Global Village (Nanaimo), Comercio Justo, Floating Stones Silks, and Solar Luna.

Newer participants are Mondo Trading, Siamari Apparel, Resilient Generations, Batiqua, Simzi Crafts and Concern for the Girl Child.

The main purpose of this popular bazaar is to lend support to the dedicated people in our area who work so hard to improve the lives of people in nations around the world, all the while using Fair Trade practices whereby workers are paid fair wages.

KAIROS Ecumenical Justice Initiatives facilitates this event that provides opportunities for these organizations to create awareness of their wonderful endeavours and for them to raise funds to carry on with the many worthwhile projects and cooperatives around the globe. They love to chat about their successes.

The event at Knox church (located at 345 Pym St. in Parksville) is scheduled for Nov. 4 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is no admission fee. It is organized by Parksville/Qualicum KAIROS and co-sponsored by Knox United Church.

— Submitted by Beulah Paugh

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