More than 20 of James Kelly’s acrylic work is hanging at the MAC until Dec. 2. — Adam Kveton Photo

Motion captured in a static frame

James Kelly brings acrylic metaphor in the abstract to Parksville

James Kelly’s work is full of potential energy, he said.

“It’s like the runner on the starting line,” said Kelly. “He’s there, he’s posed in his four-point position and he’s ready to go at the gun. If something clicked, these things would all move.”

For the first time, Kelly’s work has moved itself into the MAC for an exhibition of more than 20 acrylic paintings running until Dec. 2.

An abstract artist from Bowser who lets realism bleed into his work from time to time, Kelly said his work contains a host of things beyond their two-dimensional housings.

“To me, these things, they have a sound,” he said, with the shapes, their volumes and the lines he paints meant to impact each other and imply much more.

Of course, his own interpretation of his work is just one possibility, he said.

“The (viewer’s) own interpretation is more important,” he said. “I really truly hold the view that when I finish with it, it’s no longer mine, and it’s open to other people’s interpretation.”

But, for what it’s worth, here’s one of Kelly’s own interpretations on his piece, Swimmer.

Depicting one person watching another swimming with a red bird above, the painting is from a dream, he said.

“The scene in the painting, as long as you keep swimming and you sacrifice your concerns, you’ll be able to continue swimming,” he said.

“So the swimmer is watching himself and so the idea is give up your concerns, continue swimming and depend on your strength.” The red bird symbolizes those concerns.

The notion of sacrificing concerns, he said, includes the understanding that what a person worries about are also part of their identity.

But, that is just one interpretation of the work, he said.

Other themes to consider in the exhibit include looking at parts of images and how they are related or opposed to other parts, and the diversity of the exhibition itself, said Kelly, which reflects the diversity of a person’s own interests and concerns.

Asked what effect he hopes his work will have, Kelly said he hoped that viewers would open themselves up to letting themselves be moved by it in whatever way it might.

The exhibit runs at the MAC at 133 McMillan St. in Parksville until Dec. 2.

For more information, go to mcmillanartscentre.com/november-2017-exhibitions/.

Send news tips to:

adam.kveton@pqbnews.com

Just Posted

UPDATE: Nanoose Bay residents miffed as roadwork on Northwest Bay Road causing long delays

‘I sat in traffic for a half-hour and moved approximately 50 feet’

Oceanside RCMP officer makes Alexa’s Team

Munro able to stop and process 15 impaired motorists during the past year

Potty Mouth artist creating Funky Fungus

Parksville-Qualicum’s Carmen Lutz has people chuckling with her hand-made, rustic mugs

Qualicum Beach charity hosts fundraiser for Guatemalan students

Aldea Maya has been working in the Central American country since 2012

Parksville Lawn Bowling Club on a roll for artificial turf

Project to cost over $500,000 but will save club money

Disney Plus to launch in Canada in November

Analysts say latest streaming service may escalate cord cutting

Parksville man, 75, goes missing from north Nanaimo home

Police dog services called in to help with search

B.C. manhunt suspects left cellphone video before they died: family

Family member says Kam McLeod, Bryer Schmegelsky recorded final wishes

Okanagan bus driver assaulted for asking patron not to smoke

59-year-old in hospital with non-life threatening injuries

Wildfire burning outside of Port Alberni

Coastal Fire Centre on scene

B.C. sets rules for ride hailing, same minimum fee as taxis

Larger operating areas seen as threat by cab companies

Two hiking families team up to extinguish fire in B.C. backcountry

Children and their parents worked for three hours to ensure safety of the popular hiking region

Police seek tips in 2015 death of Island teen Brown

Four years has passed since the body of Penelakut Island woman was discovered

Most Read