The Art of Healing

It is an alternative medicine that may have been used as far back as the Stone Age, and its healing powers continue to astonish the scientific community today.

The Art of Healing

It is an alternative medicine that may have been used as far back as the Stone Age, and its healing powers continue to astonish the scientific community today.

Although it’s still not fully understood why it works so well, new registered acupuncturist in town Rebekah Blackstone knows just how the intricate art of acupuncture continues to heal her client’s pain and disorders.

“It regulates the Chi and the blood and stimulates the endorphins,” said Blackstone, adding the technique also relaxes muscles and nerve fibres.

Blackstone described Chi as the energy or life force that sustains all lives. She said the needles she strategically places — at over 400 points in the body — sends impulses to the spinal cord and activates the midbrain, pituitary gland and hypothalamus.

Blackstone has had seven years of schooling to attain her diploma and earn her title, doctor of traditional Chinese medicine. She treats a multitude of health problems like anxiety, arthritis, depression, sciatica, sexual dysfunction, skin disorders, sports injury and even toothaches.

She said the catalyst that initially started her thinking about alternative medicine came years ago when she went to her doctor in Saskatchewan describing a certain tenderness in different points all over her body. She suggested it was all related, her doctor responded “absolutely not.” Years later, Blackstone said she realized in fact it was related.

“It wasn’t until I was 23 that I discovered that yes in fact there are meridians mapped out all over the body that are related,” she said.

Blackstone said there are still those that view acupuncture as hocus pocus, because although the benefits have been proven, science has yet to provide hard evidence as to how the treatment actually works.

But B.C’s health minister George Abbott saw the benefits of acupuncture back in 2007, which is why B.C. became the first province in 2008 to allow the treatments to qualify as supplementary benefits for residents receiving premium assistance under B.C’s medical services plan (MSP).

In a press release at that time Abbott stated:

“Acupuncture is recognized worldwide as a safe and effective way to treat or manage a variety of health conditions,” he said, adding the evidence is just as compelling for acupuncture as it is for chiropractics, massage therapy and physical therapy.

Starting this week Blackstone will be offering acupuncture, as well as Tuina (Chinese acupressure) and  Seitai Shiatsu, (a form of therapeutic bodywork from Japan), at Parksville’s Natural Synergy Day Spa.

She’ll be driving out from her home in Port Alberni to practice at the spa twice a week, Wednesdays and Sundays. Blackstone has been running her own practice in Port Alberni for the past two years.

Natural Synergy Day Spa is located at #2 – 154 Middleton Ave. in Parksville, but will relocate to the Beach Club Resort in March.

For more information call Natural Synergy Day Spa at 250-586-1772  or visit www.synergydayspa.ca.   

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