VIDEO: B.C. ‘escapologist’ stuns judges on Britain’s Got Talent

Matt Johnson says televised water stunt was closest he’s come to death

On a scale of one through 10, just how dangerous is Chilliwack resident Matt Johnson’s underwater escape trick?

As he told Britain’s Got Talent’s judge Simon Cowell: “100.”

And that was no joke. When Johnson competed on the show earlier this year, he wasn’t the only one holding his breath as he struggled to complete his three-step escape. And when it was all over, he revealed that it was the closest he’s ever come to death.

This explosive escape has Johnson handcuffed and locked into a cube filled with water. It’s only after picking his handcuffs that can he attempt to find the correct key for the lock – of which there is one mixed in with 20 incorrect others. All 21 keys float in the water below him as he struggles with his hands outside the cube.

As he first steps into the box, head judge Cowell is heard to utter “This is crazy.”

He tells the judges to get him out if he passes out, and begins to float. After more two minutes underwater struggling to find this needle in the haystack, Johnson finally unlocks the last lock and opened the lid to an uproarious cheer and standing ovation from the audience and the judges.

For his efforts, which left some audience members wiping away tears of relief, Matt received an enthusiastic vote of four yeses to put him through to the reveals round. That’s where he will discover if he has made the Live Semi-Finals which will take place at the end of May. Johnson is representing Canada, and Chilliwack, as the shows only escapologist.

He has been performing and perfecting his craft in the art of illusion for more than 20 years – and his newest journey into escapology looks set to be the biggest and most profound career move yet.

Britain’s Got Talent is not the illusionist’s first foray into television. In the summer of 2017 he appeared on Penn & Teller Fool Us! and he also starred in Wizard Wars (SyFy), a show that sees the worlds top magicians battling head to head.

It is Matt’s experience in traveling the globe and performing in wildly different capacities, all the time discovering and developing his craft, which makes his performances completely unique and utterly captivating.

In a video interview with a UK television show, Johnson revealed that he dove into the routine as a way to experience what his brother deals with. His brother has a condition called tuberous sclerosis, which causes him to have irregular seizures.

“He will go a day sometimes, sometimes a week, but you don’t know when he’s going to drop, so he can’t drive or work,” the Daily Mail quoted him as saying in that interview. “Sometimes if he has two or three in a row, I wanted as a brother to understand what he goes through, and that’s how it started.”

 

Just Posted

Qualicum Beach on path to ban plastic bags

Bylaw will get legal advice prior to third reading

RDN to improve ways to deal with bylaw disputes

New system being explored that will be more efficient and effective

Hotel, restaurant and multi-use residential complex proposed for Resort Drive

Parksville could soon see more rental units, some zoned for commercial use

Inside the music: step behind the curtain at the venerable Vancouver Island Music Festival

Big Read: VIMF in the Comox Valley exemplifies the spirit of an Island summer music festival

ECHO Players’ 2018/19 season announced

Qualicum Beach theatre company to show Peter Pan musical, Enchanted April and more

BC Games: Day 3 wrap and closing ceremonies

The torch in the Cowichan Valley has been extinguished as Fort St. John gets ready to host the 2020 BC Winter Games

Police confirm girl, 8 others injured in Toronto shooting; shooter dead

Paramedics said many of the victims in Danforth, including a child, were rushed to trauma centres

Why do they do it? Coaches guide kids to wins, personal bests at the BC Games

Behind the 2,300 B.C. athletes are the 450 coaches who dedicate time to help train, compete

Government sets full-time salary range for Justin Trudeau’s nanny

At its top range, the order works out to a rate of $21.79 per hour, assuming a 40-hour work week

Lower Mainland teams battle for baseball gold at BC Games

Vancouver Coastal squeaked out a 3-2 win against Fraser Valley

The Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw people signed an agreement-in-principle with the B.C. government

The signing ceremony, at the Eliza Archie Memorial School, was 25 years in the making

POLL: Do you use the bus system regularly

Question of the week, July 17

Canada to resettle dozens of White Helmets and their families from Syria

There are fears the volunteers would become a target for government troops

Francesco Molinari wins British Open at Carnoustie

It is his first win at a major and the first by an Italian

Most Read