A passion for people makes for rewarding career change

Flexibility and ability to make a difference create a winning combination

After years working in office administration, Qualicum Beach’s Susan Atchison was looking for a career change, but wasn’t sure just what that change should look like.

She knew she missed chatting with her clients, and knew she enjoyed caring for people, but it wasn’t until a career search program brought up the idea of caregiving that she discovered her current passion: working as a part-time care aid with Bayshore Home Health.

“I wasn’t sure I wanted to go back to my former career, but I realized I missed the clients the most – I loved chatting with them and hearing their stories,” she reflects.

Today, the grandmother of four is enjoying “the best of both worlds – taking care of my young ones at home and working with older clients in the community,” Susan says. “I can still enjoy my active life and the activities that I love, while making a difference in the lives of others.”

Because Susan had to balance caring for her own parents, the part-time option at Bayshore was been the perfect fit, although full-time positions for registered and non-registered care aids were also possible.

Sharing a unique perspective

Susan’s personal experience with her own parents also gives her a unique perspective when caring for her clients and working with their families.

“You build a rapport,” Susan reflects. “While children often remember their parents as they were, and what they were once able to do, I get to meet people where they are now. It’s helps me understand what they may need to make their life easier and happiest.

“It is being able to read people. As we have a conversation, I learn about them and how I can best help them.”

Because older parents will often hide concerns from their families for fear of worrying them, trained care aids often become aware of concerns families don’t see – especially when children live out of town.

“We’re kind of like the family’s eyes and ears and can let them know of changes that may be happening,” Susan says.

A little care makes a big difference

Working in private care, Susan appreciates the ability to take a little extra time with her clients, especially important when companionship is a big part of the caregiving goals at Bayshore Home Health, which is currently welcoming applications for care aids in the Parksville/Qualicum area.

“There’s a real satisfaction in knowing that I’m helping a person with their activities of daily living while letting them guide me in what they need. You’re trying to do things in the way that makes them happiest and preserve their dignity.”

If you’re looking for the opportunity to make a difference in someone’s life, Bayshore Home Health serving Parksville and Qualicum offers a rewarding work environment, competitive wages and benefits. For more information about employment opportunities, call 250-947-9775, visit bayshore.ca or send your resume to Nanaimo@bayshore.ca

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