People often come across fawns they believe to be abandoned, however does will often leave fawns hidden in grass or shrubs for a day or more while they leave to feed without drawing the attention of predators.

See a fawn? Leave it alone!

Discovery Day launches summer season at North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre June 22

The North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre team is passionate about supporting Island wildlife, but each spring, they see many more fawns than they should as well-meaning animal lovers jump to the “rescue” too soon.

Located in Errington, a few minutes outside Parksville, the centre takes in ill, injured or orphaned wildlife, rehabilitating those that can be released back to the wild and providing a home to those that can’t. Non-releasable animals become ambassadors for the needs of wildlife and the vital work undertaken at the centre, which welcomes visitors for self-guided tours and special events.

But while the centre exists to help local wildlife, the key message each spring, as we begin seeing more deer grazing, is this: If you see a fawn, leave it alone, says Sylvia Campbell, association co-founder with husband Robin.

“It’s a huge issue,” Campbell says. “This time of year, as people start hiking more and spending time in the garden, they come across healthy fawns they believe are orphaned or abandoned, and bring them in thinking they’re rescuing them.”

More often that not, however, the fawns are just fine and need to be returned where they were found.

In a unique adaptation, much like their spots, fawns carry no scent, Campbell explains. Their mothers will often leave them hidden in grass or shrubs for a day or more while they leave to feed without drawing the attention of predators.

Similarly, young fawns may appear injured as they toddle across the road after their mother, but rather than being picked up, should be gently herded across to where the doe is likely waiting.

If uncertain about a fawn, call the centre at 250-248-8534 before moving it.

Discover the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association

It’s this kind of essential information the Wildlife Recovery Centre shares through events like Discovery Day, coming up from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 22.

The kick-off to the summer season, Discovery Day is chock full of events and activities for all ages. “Bring the family for a day of discovery!” Campbell says.

In addition to visiting animals like Knut, the centre’s black bear ambassador, and Dougal, their beautiful blind raven, visitors can take in scavenger hunts, a reptile presentation, and drumming with Indigenous artist Bill Helin. Explore Turtle Town, the wildlife garden and the volunteer-led “Learning from the Bones,” sharing fascinating facts revealed by animal skeletons, and have a bite from the on-site food trucks.

Come explore with a special $5 Discovery Day adult rate, with those 12 and younger free.

Throughout the year, donations and volunteers are essential to making the centre’s work possible. Click here to learn about how you can contribute – remember, “They depend on us; we depend on you,” Campbell says.

Learn more at niwra.org, call 250-248-8534 and visit at 1240 Leffler Rd, Errington.

 

Help the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre in Errington celebrate the start of the summer season during Discovery Day, June 22.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Parksville residents concerned about garbage, needles in Mark’s Nature Park

City pays to have Finholm Street park cleaned each week

Individuals chosen to begin ‘road to recovery’ at supportive housing facility

Orca Place at 222 Corfield St. is expected to open this summer

RCMP make arrest following break-in at Parksville’s Log Cabin General Store

Police credit tips from public for helping with case

Qualicum Beach craft beer festival to showcase local brews, spirits

Event will feature 20 Vancouver Island breweries and distilleries

VIDEO: Killer whale steals fisherman’s catch off North Coast

Fishing duel results in eager orca snagging salmon in Prince Rupert

Child killed after being hit in driveway on Vancouver Island

The driver of the vehicle remained at the crash scene and is fully cooperating

Vancouver Island woman assaulted after confronting thief

RCMP warn residents to call for police assistance

Cat badly hurt in animal trap was likely stuck for days, B.C. owner says

Blu, a three-year-old house cat, suffered severe damage to his hind leg after being stuck in trap for days

Island Health issues safer drug-use tips ahead of music festival season

Health authority aims to reduce overdose risks at festivals

40 cats surrendered in apparent hoarding at B.C. home

Officers found the cats living among piles of garbage and feces, suffering from fleas

PHOTOS: North Island home gutted in fire deemed ‘suspicious’

No injuries reported; firefighters prevented blaze from spreading

Eating sandwiches, putting on makeup behind the wheel could land you a fine

RCMP say if you cause an accident while eating you could be penalized

Fate of accused in Canadian couple’s 1987 killings in jury’s hands

William Talbott’s lawyer says DNA doesn’t prove murder

Most Read