A living wage within reach

Work should lift people out of poverty, not keep them there, states the Living Wage Advisory Committee

Marie and Rick Sullivan at an Occupy rally in Nanaimo last year. As members of the Oceanside Coalition for Strong Communities

Marie and Rick Sullivan at an Occupy rally in Nanaimo last year. As members of the Oceanside Coalition for Strong Communities

The number of living wage employers is growing in B.C. and local proponents hope to bring it to District 69.

“We want to raise awareness and begin to change the way people look at poverty,” said provincial campaign organizer Michael McCarthy Flynn of Living Wage for Families.

The idea came in response to B.C. having the highest rate of child poverty in the country and the fact that nearly half of children in poverty have at least one parent working full time, meaning low wages are a big part of the problem.

A living wage is calculated for each community, adjusted for inflation and based on an average family with two working parents and two school age children.

In Vancouver for example each adult would have to make $18.81 per hour, in District 69 it is $16.27.

The wage should cover what they call “bare bones expenses,” with the Vancouver example including monthly expenses of $768 for food, $1,360 for shelter and $496 for transportation. It does not cover debt payments, vacations or saving for retirement, children’s education or emergencies.

It includes $933 a month for all contingencies and miscellaneous costs for a family of four including entertainment.

Their slogan is “Work should lift you out of poverty, not keep you there,” and to that end they look at wages in a wider context.

Local advocates point out that in the District 69 calculation childcare is the largest single item, so they suggest a $10 a day public childcare system to reduce the local wage to $13 an hour.

A survey last year found 67 per cent of British Columbians support the idea and it is growing with local organizations including an endorsement by the school board, which is exploring the idea.

The City of New Westminster was the first to sign on, both for their own employees and their contractors, getting almost entirely positive feedback. Other communities have since followed.

In May 2011 Vancity — the largest credit union in the country — became a living wage employer which McCarthy Flynn said was ideal because it doesn’t hurt the bottom line of large operations and the spin-offs are big.

“It starts to make sense to pay a living wage if you want to do business with those companies and communities.”

He compared it to environmentalism 20 years ago when most companies would laugh it off, now everyone advertises how green they are.

“Those organizations then directly begin to stimulate the local economy,” he said. “If you raise wages you stimulate the economy by putting more money in the hands of a larger group of people that are desperate to buy things.”

He said a number of studies show that poverty — and even more specifically inequality — have direct negative impacts on health care, education and social cohesion.

“We have to remember the economy is just the means to an end, it’s not an end in itself. It’s there to help people live better lives and be better educated.”

While B.C. minister of finance Kevin Falcon said he doesn’t believe inequality is a bad thing, in response to a BC Stats report that B.C. has the widest gap between the top and bottom 20 percent of incomes of any province, McCarthy Flynn disagreed.

“More income equal countries like Japan and Scandinavia are actually more competitive than inequal countries like the U.S.”

“It’s not an issue of financial resources, there’s plenty to go around,” he added, wondering why people have bought into the “pressure that we have to keep wages low or we’re not competitive. It’s the high end jobs that make a community or country competitive, not minimum wage jobs.”

He said that while it seems like a hot topic, “there’s no actual debate about these things, there’s no dialogue, just two opposing sides. We have to get away from that.”

He stresses that the concept is voluntary, pointing out “many smaller companies simply can’t afford it. Often small business owners aren’t making a living wage themselves,” so they wouldn’t pressure anyone.

“There are many things we can do through tax credits and government subsidies,” he said calling on the population to at least begin the conversation.

The District 69 Living Wage group is working on public events in the near future. Watch The News for more information or check http://livingwageforfamilies.ca.

 

Just Posted

The remains of the Mid-Island Co-op in Whiskey Creek along the Alberni Highway on Friday, June 18, after a blaze the day before devastated the gas station. (Michael Briones photo)
VIDEO: Whiskey Creek gas station burned to the ground after camper van explosion

Nine fire departments responded to the incident, no injuries reported

John Furlong told the Vancouver Board of Trade on Feb. 20, 2020 that he thinks the city could and should bid for the 2030 Winter Games. (CP photo)
The Co-op gas station at Whiskey Creek is burning after a camper van burst into flames just before 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 17, 2021. (FACEBOOK PHOTO)
Exploding camper van torches Highway 4 gas station between Qualicum Beach and Port Alberni

Highway traffic blocked after Whiskey Creek gas station erupts into flames

Morningstar Golf Club in Parksville will host the 2021 B.C. Junior Golf Championships. (PQB News file photo)
Morningstar Golf Club in Parksville to host 150 of B.C’s top junior golfers

Provincial boys and girls championship begins June 28

A small pod of Pacific white-sided dolphins pass by close to shore in Campbell River June 16, 2021. Still capture from video courtesy of Kimberly Hart
VIDEO: Dolphin sunset captured from Vancouver Island shore

Spectacular setting for view of travelling pod of Pacific white-sided dolphins

Stanley Fischer, right, died while in a Victoria police jail cell hours after he was arrested on Nov. 15, 1981. (Photo courtesy of Mark Fischer)
Victoria police not reopening investigation into man’s 1981 death while in custody

Stanley Fischer’s death was ruled a suicide after he was found in his jail cell

A search is underway for a 75-year-old fisherman who went missing near Port Angeles Thursday evening. (Courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard)
Search continues for angler missing between Port Angeles and Victoria

Canadian, U.S. Coast Guard searching for 75-year-old man reported missing Thursday evening

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam listens to a question during a news conference, in Ottawa, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021. The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases attributed to the highly contagious Delta variant grew in Canada this week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s public health agency reports spike in confirmed cases of Delta variant

More than 2,000 cases of the variant confirmed across all 10 provinces and in one territory

Bella Bella is on B.C.’s Central Coast, accessible only by air and ocean. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
B.C. provides $22 million for Heiltsuk development on Central Coast

Elders care home project, tourism, lumber mill supported

The federal government says it wants to ban most flavoured vaping products in a bid to reduce their appeal to youth. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Craig Mitchelldyer
Health Canada proposes ban on most vaping flavours it says appeal to youth

If implemented, the regulations would restrict all e-cigarette flavours except tobacco, mint and menthol

Seth Rogen’s vibrant orange sculpture was sold for $7,000 above Vancouver Art Gallery’s initial estimation at auction Tuesday. June 15. (Heffel Fine Arts)
Vase made by Seth Rogen sells for $12,000 at Vancouver auction

The B.C.-born comedian has a new pot habit and it’s paying off

BC Lions running back John White IV (3) runs with the ball during first quarter CFL football action against the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Saturday, September 21, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
BC Lions file trademark for new logo

Canadian Football League team files for new design on June 1

The Montreal Police logo is seen in Montreal on Wednesday, July 8, 2020. Some Quebec politicians are calling for an investigation after a video was released that appears to show a Montreal police officer with his leg on a young Black man’s neck during an arrest. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Probe called for after video appearing to show Montreal officer’s knee on Black youth’s neck

Politicians call for investigation after clip evokes memories of George Floyd incident

Most Read