Alien invasion in Parksville

Alien invasive species the focus of a presentation to Parksville city council this week; plus other city council briefs

Knotweed can grow four centimetres in a day. Its roots can go three metres deep into the ground and spread 20 metres laterally. It grows through asphalt, creating hazards on roads and sidewalks. It has toxic sap that can create third-degree burns.

Parksville city council learned this week about the importance of eradicating alien invasive species like knotweed and hogweed. Rachelle McElroy from the Coastal Invasive Species Committee provided some shocking facts and encouraged the city to attack these weeds early and aggressively.

“What all these plants have in common is they cause harm,” said McElroy.

In 2015, the committee had a hand in treating 41 residential sites. The province has legislation related to invasive species. Some municipalities, including Parksville, have bylaws too, detailing how and when the city can deal with the weeds on both public and private lands.

“Good on you,” said McElroy. It (the bylaw) is a great tool for a community to use.”

This is year two of a partnership between Parksville, Qualicum Beach and Nanaimo to tackle knotweed and hogweed. The Regional District of Nanaimo joined the partnership earlier this year. To report one of these weeds, call 1-250-857-2472 or e-mail: info@coastalisc.com.

Other items from city council’s meeting Monday night:

• Coun. Al Greir introduced a motion attempting to limit what council could discuss behind closed doors (also called ‘in camera’).

“I think we are having far too many of them (in camera meetings),” said Greir. “I think we owe it to the public to have more transparency.”

Grier’s motion failed 6-1.

• By a 4-3 margin, Coun. Mary Beil’s motion to set aside $12,500 in next year’s budget for the purchase of a fast electric car charger passed on Monday night.

Beil, Mayor Marc Lefebvre and councillors Kirk Oates and Teresa Patterson were in favour, while councillors Al Greir, Leanne Salter and Sue Powell were opposed.

Just Posted

Qualicum Beach moves on grant for Eaglecrest roundabout

Council votes unanimously to have staff push for application

Dying motorcyclist from Coombs gets last-ride tribute

Friends grant Corinna Pitney’s wish ‘to hear bikes roar, to see leather and chrome’

Parksville author shares journey on famed 800 km trail

Books, movie inspire Roxey Edwards to walk Camino de Santiago, write book

Advance voting numbers in for Qualicum Beach, Parksville, RDN

More people vote ahead of time than in previous election

Man jailed after pilfering items from arena in Parksville

60-year-old caught after thefts from change rooms; victims used app to locate belongings

Secret supper clubs test appetite for cannabis-infused food ahead of legalization

Chefs are eagerly awaiting pot edibles to become legal in Canada

Joint inspection planned for missing journalist at Saudi Consulate

Turkish officials have said they fear a Saudi hit team killed and dismembered Washington Potst reporter Jamal Khashoggi

Sears files for bankruptcy amid plunging sales, massive debt

The company started as a mail order catalogue in the 1880s

BREAKING: Prince Harry and Meghan expecting their 1st child in spring

The announcement of the pregnancy confirms weeks of speculation from royal watchers

Enbridge to begin building road to access pipeline explosion site in B.C.

An explosion Tuesday knocked out a 91-centimetre line

Andrew Scheer on revamped NAFTA deal: ‘I would have signed a better one’

Conservative leader says he wouldn’t have signed USMCA

Matheson will have NHL hearing after Canucks rookie Pettersson hit

The 19-year-old Swedish centre appeared woozy after the hit

GUEST COLUMN: A better way to manage B.C.’s public construction

Claire Trevena responds to Andrew Wilkinson on NDP union policy

B.C. brewery creates bread beer from food waste

The brew aims to raise food waste awareness and provide funds for the food bank

Most Read