WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

Another B.C. deer dies after being impaled on wrought iron fence

Conservation officer said this is the tenth deer to suffer before being euthanized

WARNING: The photos below are graphic in nature and show an animal in distress. Reader discretion is advised.

Kelowna conservation officers euthanized another mule deer impaled by a pointed wrought iron fence in the upper Mission area in Kelowna on March 20.

“Since January 1, 2019 we have had to euthanize approximately 10 deer alive, injured in pain and suffering hung up on these fences,” said conservation officer Ken Owens.

We are recommending and working cooperatively with the city of Kelowna to enact a bylaw prohibiting these fences that are impaling deer locally.”

READ MORE: Trapped deer part of government research project

Owens said the deer was euthanized due to severe injuries caused by the fence. On the whole, Owen said those fence can be very dangerous to deer and other wildlife and this situation is also occurring in other communities across the province.

“These fences can cause animals pain and suffering as they struggle to free themselves and in many cases die stuck on the fence,” said Owens.

“Wrought iron fences are a major source for potential injury to a deer. Many railing patterns and especially those with pointed pickets rising above the top or mid-rail are the most likely to injure or impale a deer,”

Owens said there are simple design fixes for new fences or retrofits for existing ones can make a big difference.

READ MORE: Conservation officer frees B.C. deer from flotation gear mishap

“No property owner wants to have to put an animal out of its misery, or cut it down from a fence,” Owens said.

For more information on ways to reduce human wildlife conflict contact the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277 or visit wild safe B.C.


@LarynGilmour
laryn.gilmour@blackpress.ca

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Photo Credit: Ken Owens, Conservation Officer, North Okanagan Zone

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