B.C. woman fined $2,300 for clocking 215 km/hr in Alberta

It’s the highest fine Alberta police have issued

A B.C. woman was fined $2,300 for speeding – the highest yet.

Samantha Bookey, 30, from Aldergrove was fined in Boyle court Nov. 20, after she was clocked going 215 km/hr in her Acura TL by Boyle RCMP on Aug. 24, 2017, just after 9 p.m. The speed limit was 110 km/hr

“This is an extreme and dangerous rate of speed, and the court has recognized that,” said Cst. Paul Banks of the Boyle RCMP-Alberta Sheriffs Integrated Traffic Unit. “At high speeds your ability to react to something on the road, including other vehicles, people and animals is greatly reduced, as is your stopping distance. You also risk an increase in severity of injury when there is a collision.”

RELATED: B.C. man nets $1,750 fine for speeding 70 kilometres over limit in Alberta

The traffic unit had received complaints about the same vehicle driving at high rates of speed and passing other vehicles on double solid lines and near the school in Grassland.

The woman was given a summons to appear in court, which is automatic for those charged with going more than 50 km/hr over the speed limit. She didn’t appear in Boyle court and was found guilty in her absence.

“The Crown did make an application for an ex-parte trial and the court did accept that application and the trial went ahead without her and she was convicted based on the Crown’s evidence,” said Cst. Banks. “It was an excessive rate of speed.”

Cst. Banks said, unfortunately, some drivers go that fast but added, “We were able to intercept one in this case.”

Alberta doesn’t have laws in place to allow police to seize vehicles at the scene for excessive rates of speed, said Cst. Banks.

“Some other provinces do.”

If Bookey doesn’t pay the fine by the date specified by the court, the police will make an application for her to spend time in jail in default.Cst. Banks said Bookey was given a year to pay the fine because it’s high. If she is in default she will have to spend 25 days in jail.

RELATED: Sometimes bad things happen. But it’s always good when we can walk away and tell the story

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