A lawyer for a Canadian man recently freed with his wife and children after years of being held hostage in Afghanistan says his client has been arrested and faces at least a dozen charges. Joshua Boyle speaks to members of the media at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport on Friday, October 13, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Case against former hostage Joshua Boyle adjourned until Monday

Boyle faces charges including sexual assault, assault and forcible confinement.

Former Canadian hostage Joshua Boyle made a brief video appearance in an Ottawa courtroom today after being charged with 15 offences, including sexual assault, following his release from captivity in Afghanistan.

Boyle’s appearance in an orange jumpsuit from the Ottawa Carleton Detention Centre lasted less than two minutes before Justice Norman Boxall agreed to adjourn the case until Monday.

Before the matter was adjourned, Boxall was told Boyle has retained high-profile Ottawa criminal lawyer Lawrence Greenspon as part of his defence team, although Greenspon was not in court.

Court documents show that the 15 charges against Boyle include eight counts of assault, two of sexual assault, two of unlawful confinement and one count of causing someone to “take a noxious thing, namely Trazodone,” an antidepressant.

There is also a charge of uttering a death threat and another of misleading a police officer. The purported acts allegedly occurred between Oct. 14 and Dec. 30 after Boyle returned to Canada.

Related: Ex-hostage Joshua Boyle charged with sex assault, assault, forcible confinement: lawyer

A publication ban prevents identifying the alleged victims or any witnesses. The charges have not been proven in court.

Boyle and his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, were taken hostage in 2012 by a Taliban-linked group while on a backpacking trip in Afghanistan. Coleman was pregnant at the time and the couple had three children in captivity.

Lawyer Eric Granger, who represented Boyle during the hearing, was also not in court today, although on Tuesday he said his client is “coping.”

“He’s as OK as anyone is who is suddenly and unexpectedly facing charges for the first time,” he said.

The Prime Minister’s Office also said it would not comment since the investigation is ongoing, although a government official has confirmed that the Boyles met with Justin Trudeau at the family’s request.

The prime minister generally meets with any returning hostage with connections to Canada, and discussion of the hostage-taking was the main purpose of the meeting with the Boyles, said the official.

Boyle has said he and his wife were helping ordinary villagers in a Taliban-controlled area of Afghanistan when they were seized. He told The Canadian Press that conditions during their five-year ordeal changed over time as the family was shuffled among at least three prisons.

He described the first as “remarkably barbaric,” the second as more comfortable and the third as a place of violence in which he and his wife were frequently separated and beaten.

Boyle said their captors from the Taliban-linked Haqqani network raped his wife and had also caused her to suffer a miscarriage. Shortly after landing in Toronto after being rescued, he demanded that his kidnappers be brought to justice.

In an interview with ABC News, Coleman, who is from Stewartstown, Pa., recalled that guards dragged her husband from their cell, and one of them threw her on the ground, shouting, “I will kill you, I will kill you” before assaulting her.

She also said their captors beat their eldest son with a stick.

The couple and their children had gone to Boyle’s parents home in Smiths Falls, Ont., after being rescued.

— With files from The Associated Press

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

CRIME: Thefts of vehicles, TVs, $300 in meat in Parksville QB area

Pair of prawn traps also stolen from Nanoose Bay

Qualicum Beach gaming company awarded virtual reality game of the year

Cloudhead Games lauded as it teases new project with ‘industry giant’

Parksville martial arts student earns first international gold

Training pays off for Cascadia Martial Arts pupil Gucela

Single-use retail plastic bags to be banned in Parksville March 1

Over the next few months, the city will undertake public education outreach

Retail pot business interest in Parksville

City gets two referrals for licences; QB expected to have first cannabis store soon

Tommy Chong says cannabis legalization makes him proud to be a Canadian

Legendary marijuana advocate and comedian celebrates cultural milestone at Kelowna event

B.C. passenger caught smoking weed in a car issued $230 fine

Saanich police did a field sobriety test on the driver and deemed it safe for him to drive

Payette invites critics to ‘come and spend a few days’ with her

Governor General Julie Payette made her first official to B.C. back in March

More pot stores expected in B.C. in coming ‘weeks and months’: attorney general

Attorney General David Eby and Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth visited the new BC Cannabis Store in the province’s Interior

Telus launches charitable foundation to help vulnerable youth

The Telus Friendly Future Foundation complements other social initiatives by the company, including Mobility for Good

Police say suspicious death of B.C. artist ruled a homicide

Patrick Zube Aylward’s body was found in a residence on a rural road outside of Seton Portage, west of Lillooet, B.C.

Temporary roads being built in areas affected by landslide in northern B.C.

Emergency Management BC news release says Disaster Financial Assistance is available to eligible residents of the Peace River Regional District who may have been affected by the landslides

B.C. tickets win big in Lotto Max draw

Jackpot carried over; B.C. tickets share Max Millions prizes

Most Read