Phyllis Carlyle

Diversity attracted top administrator for Regional District of Nanaimo

NANAIMO – Phyllis Carlyle, new Regional District of Nanaimo chief administrative officer, has started her new job.

The “fantastic” geography is one of the reasons Phyllis Carlyle signed on as new Regional District of Nanaimo chief administrative officer.

Carlyle, former City of Richmond general manager of law and community safety, was hired in August and she started her new post Oct. 11.

Carlyle said the Nanaimo area is large and very diverse.

“You have heavily urbanized areas, you have rural areas and so from a governance perspective, that’s very exciting. You’re doing the whole span of municipal services, so you’re not just limited to urban issues. You have to look at the Agricultural Land Commission, the urban-rural interface, you’ve got marine, you’ve got airport uses, so from a professional perspective, it was very exciting,” said Carlyle.

When asked about goals, Carlyle said one of the tenets that guides her is an “absolute belief in open government and public service.” She said she will look at the way the regional district communicates with the public, receives information and will look to ensure that it has dialogue with everyone in the community.

“Part of my responsibilities as chief administrator is to ensure that the employees at the regional district are well served,” said Carlyle. “That they’re happy in what they do and that they provide good service and they provide effective, efficient and economical service as well, so that’s what I’ll be looking for in my tenure here.”

The regional district budget process will run from November to March and that is what is occupying Carlyle’s mind as her new job begins.

“I’m having four solid days of pre-budget discussions with the staff … there’s been a lot of work done already in anticipation of my arrival. We have an excellent chief financial officer [in Wendy Idema] and I have every confidence in her ability to bring forward a fulsome budget for the board’s consideration,” said Carlyle.

Carlyle possesses a law degree from UBC and a master of science degree in environmental studies from the University of Calgary and that coupled with her experience in Richmond will be beneficial in her new job.

“Certainly legal training is crucial. A background in law is very important in terms of assisting any corporation in its workings these days,” Carlyle said.

Carlyle succeeds Paul Thorkelsson, who stepped down last December to become the District of Saanich’s chief administrative officer.

Just Posted

BC Ferries crew member taken to hospital after getting struck by bow doors

Two sailings between Horseshoe Bay and Departure Bay were cancelled

Parksville Qualicum Beach crime report: Thieves pilfer laptops, tools, big-screen TV, cash and more

Oceanside RCMP received 256 complaints between Sept. 29 and Oct. 5.

Controversial SD69 discussions continue regarding field trips requiring air travel

Some Qualicum district students believe motion takes away too much from experience at school

Pole-climbing thieves pilfering wire in Parksville Qualicum Beach area

Repairs are costly and thefts jeopardize public safety

Qualicum Beach council discusses helping out Orca Place residents

Town considers offer of temporary jobs in the future

ELECTION 2019: It’s so close, it could come down to who turns out to vote

Black Press Media’s polling analyst on the origins of predictive seat modelling in Canada

Jack’s Devils beat Quinn’s Canucks 1-0 in NHL brother battle

New Jersey youngster scores first career goal against Vancouver

Two charged after owner’s wild ride through Kamloops in his stolen truck

Crystal Rae Dorrington, 37, and Derrick Ronald Pearson, 32, facing multiple charges

Judge orders credit union’s bank records for Kelowna social worker facing theft allegations

The man is accused of negligence, breach of contract, fraud and a conspiracy with Interior Savings

Leaders pour it on with rallies, boosts for candidates as campaign reaches peak

The federal election campaign has reached a crescendo

Allegations of racism lead to ministry investigation at Vancouver private school

St. George’s School was contacted over what the school describes as ‘deeply offensive behaviour online’

Not a political question: Thunberg calls for climate action in Alberta

Edmonton police estimated the size of the crowd at about 4,000

Zantac, the over-the-counter heartburn drug, pulled in Canada, U.S.

Health Canada also investigates possible carcinogen in some ranitidine drugs

B.C. public safety minister says cannabis edibles not in stores til January

Mike Farnworth says he wants regional issues considered when it comes to licensing

Most Read