Northern Gateway pipeline has been the focus of many protests

Enbridge pipeline will hit wall in B.C., critics say

Environmental and aboriginal opponents say Northern Gateway will be tied up in court and will never be built

Environmental groups and First Nations quickly condemned the National Energy Board’s recommendation to approve the Northern Gateway oil pipeline project and predicted it will never be built.

Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs president Grand Chief Stewart Philip said the battle will likely move into the courtrooms as First Nations mount legal challenges to Enbridge’s project – assuming it is approved in the months ahead by the federal government.

“This is about the environmental integrity of the watersheds we all share and we are willing to go to any lengths to defend our watersheds,” he said. “We are prepared to go to the wall against this project. We have no choice.”

Wilderness Committee policy director Gwen Barlee called it a reckless, foolish, disappointing decision that will run into a wall of opposition in B.C.

“It’s going to be tied up in courts for many, many, many years,” she said. “Environmental organizations will be standing with First Nations and standing with the hundreds of thousands of other British Columbians who oppose this project and don’t want to see it proceed.”

Barlee said the recommendation of approval flies in the face of a newly released federal report that flagged an insufficient capability to respond to an oil spill on the coast.

“This is a project that’s dangerous to our climate, dangerous to our coast and dangerous to our rivers and our salmon,” she said.

“We vow to stand shoulder to shoulder with First Nations, and the thousands of others who oppose this project,” said Murray Minchin of Kitimat-based Douglas Channel Watch, which was an intervenor in the hearings. “We are determined to keep the north coast of B.C. bitumen-free.”

The twin pipelines, carrying diluted heavy bitumen from northern Alberta to Kitimat and condensate used to dilute the heavy oil in the opposite direction, would carve across hundreds of creeks and rivers and send oil tankers out through the narrow passages of B.C.’s north coast.

Ecojustice staff lawyer Barry Robinson said the NEB ignored a huge volume of evidence indicating Northern Gateway is unsafe, unsustainable and unnecessary.

Others argued Enbridge has not proven itself competent to be trusted with B.C.’s environment, citing its 2010 spill of diluted bitumen into the Kalamazoo River in Michigan.

Most environmental campaigners said they were not surprised, citing federal government moves to weaken environmental standards and protection for habitat in the Fisheries Act.

Ninety-six per cent of written comments to the Joint Review Panel, including the submissions of the province, opposed the Northern Gateway pipeline.

ForestEthics campaigner Ben West predicted the ruling will inflame already widespread opposition.

“Really what happened today was more like throwing fuel on a fire,” he said. “It’s the people that truly grant the permission. In this case the people have clearly rejected the pipeline and that is what will matter in the end.”

Just Posted

Parksville ready to party like it’s 1945

City will celebrate 75th birthday on June 19, 2020

Assessments needed before Parksville beach cleanup could get green light

Permits, reviews would cost city an estimated $164,000

Joint effort helps extinguish shop fire in Coombs

Firefighters quickly contain blaze that spread to nearby trees

Parksville’s Kurz runs 160 kilometres in less than 24 hours

Former Ballenas athlete raises more than $8,000 for Terry Fox Foundation

VIDEO: Rare white killer whale captured by drone near Campbell River

The transient orca has been named Tl’uk, a Coast Salish word that means ‘moon.’

VIDEO: After 73 years, siblings separated by adoption reunite in B.C

Donna Smith of Abbotsford and Clayton Myers of Williams Lake are glad they met each other

B.C.-born Carey Price brings young fan to tears at NHL Awards banquet

Anderson Whitehead first met his hockey idol after his mother died of cancer

Licence issue delays boozing while cruising on BC Ferries

Planned June launch for alcohol sales delayed

Nanaimo a prime market for new plane, Air Canada says

Vice-president previews Airbus A220, praises Nanaimo’s growth in passenger numbers

B.C. school mourns after 13-year-old killed by fallen tree on field trip

Teenager died after being struck and pinned by tree while on a field trip near Sooke

RCMP deploys special unit in Comox Valley to combat organized crime

Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit spends four days targeting organized crime in Courtenay

B.C. temporarily halts resource development to protect caribou

The caribou population in northeastern B.C. has dwindled over the last two decades

Most Read