Participants in a detailed route hearing sit at four tables in the Clearwater Legion Hall on Tuesday, March 6. At the far end are three National Energy Board panellists, on the right are five Trans Mountain representatives, staff members from NEB sit on the table on the left, and at the near table are complainants and lawyers.

pipeline

Energy board to hear traditional Indigenous evidence in Trans Mountain review

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government ordered the energy board to review the marine impacts and submit a report no later than Feb. 22

The National Energy Board will hear oral traditional evidence from Indigenous groups in the coming weeks as part of its new review of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

The Federal Court of Appeal struck down the federal government’s approval of the project in August, citing inadequate Indigenous consultation and the energy board’s failure to review the project’s impacts on the marine environment.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government ordered the energy board to review the marine impacts and submit a report no later than Feb. 22, and on Wednesday the board unveiled its schedule for oral traditional evidence.

Thirty-one Indigenous groups or individuals from Canada and the U.S. are scheduled to participate and the hearings will be held in Calgary the week of Nov. 19, in Victoria the week of Nov. 26 and in Nanaimo, B.C., the week of Dec. 3.

READ MORE: NEB wants to hear your thoughts on Trans Mountain pipeline

Some First Nations that won the court battle in August, including British Columbia’s Tsleil-Waututh and Squamish Nations, say the new process is too rushed and they’re considering filing fresh court challenges after the board issues its report.

The energy board responds to concerns about the timeline in documents released Wednesday, saying there’s already significant evidence on the record and legislation requires it to conduct proceedings within the time limit set by the federal government.

The board includes oral traditional evidence because it “understands that Indigenous peoples have an oral tradition for sharing knowledge from generation to generation,” it says in the documents.

“This information cannot always be shared adequately or appropriately in writing,” it says.

The traditional evidence previously provided in the first Trans Mountain review remains on the record, it says, and board members will read transcripts prior to the new hearings.

The board adds that Indigenous interveners should file any scientific evidence or expert reports as written evidence.

Those scheduled to participate include the Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh, the pro-pipeline Cheam First Nation, a coalition of U.S. tribes and B.C. Green party member of the legislature Adam Olsen, who is Indigenous.

The project would increase tanker traffic seven-fold in Burrard Inlet off Metro Vancouver’s coast, raising concerns about impacts on salmon and endangered southern resident killer whales.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Ballenas Whalers football players honoured after stellar high school season

Chomolok, Rykers earn most valuable player accolades

‘Elizabeth Little Waterfront Park’ proposed in Qualicum Beach

It was first announced in 2018 that St. Andrews Lodge would be turned into a public space

RDN budget talks to include public consultation results

Director not impress with level of engagement

VIDEO: Music stars pay tribute to Kobe Bryant at Grammys award show

Music artists including Billy Ray Cyrus, Rick Ross and Kirk Franklin paid tribute to Bryant

Furstenau flays NDP as she launches B.C. Green Party leadership bid

LNG, Site C dam wrong for environment, Cowichan MLA says

Woman guilty of dangerous driving crash that left Saanich girl, then 11, unresponsive

Nikirk guilty of one count of dangerous driving causing bodily harm

Pregnant B.C. woman stuck in Wuhan, the epicentre of coronavirus outbreak

Woman is due to give birth in Wuhan, China unless she can get out

Victoria-area wolf tranquilized after being seen running around neighbourhood

Officials say wolf unharmed during its ‘arrest’

Ontario confirms second presumptive coronavirus case in wife of first patient

Both arrived on a China Southern Airlines flight after having been to Wuhan

Canada’s basketball community mourns Kobe Bryant after helicopter crash

Bryant was an 18-time NBA all-star who won five championships

‘Devastated’: Fans, celebrities remember Kobe Bryant after his death

Bryant played all of his 20-year career with the NBA with the Los Angeles Lakers

Investigation launched after six dead puppies dumped in Richmond hotel parking lot

RAPS reminds people they can always give up puppies they can’t take care of

Most Read