B.C. government Throne Speech puts focus on housing, child care, affordability

NDP expected to target childcare and housing

British Columbia’s New Democrats say their quest to make life more affordable for residents involves making the largest-ever investments in housing and child care.

In its speech from the throne on Tuesday, the minority government says its ultimate goal is affordability for B.C. residents.

The speech outlining the government’s plans, read by Lt.-Gov. Judith Guichon, says it will move to address housing demand and stabilize B.C.’s out-of-control real estate and rental markets.

The government plans to take measures to ensure people who seek to profit from B.C.’s real estate market will also contribute to housing solutions.

The speech says legislation will be introduced to crack down on tax fraud, tax evasion and money laundering in B.C.’s real estate market.

It says the government will start the journey this year to affordable, quality child care by moving to convert unlicensed spaces to licensed, regulated care allowing more parents to benefit from savings provided by the government.

“Safe, affordable, licensed child care will become B.C.’s standard, giving parents the peace of mind they need and quality care they can rely on,” Guichon said in the legislature. “We begin this year by making a difference in the cost of child care for tens of thousands of families with the largest investment in child care in B.C. history.”

The speech says the greatest challenge to affordability in B.C. is housing.

“Young families wait longer to have children, or give up their dreams of home ownership because they cannot afford to pay for both,” Guichon said. “Businesses cannot grow when the skilled workers they need are shut out by the high cost of housing. Renters are afraid of eviction or unexpected rent increases that will force them to relocate when prices are sky high and vacancies hover at record lows.”

The speech says the results of real estate speculation are evident across B.C. with distorted markets, high prices and empty homes.

“Your government believes that people seeking to profit from B.C.’s real estate must also contribute to housing solutions,” said Guichon. “Safe, decent housing is a right that is under threat by speculators, domestic and foreign, who seek windfall profits at the expense of people who work, live and pay taxes in B.C.”

The speech says the government will pursue its innovation goals with plans to create 2,900 new technology related spaces at colleges and universities throughout B.C.

Catch up on Black Press Media’s coverage of childcare and housing here:

Just Posted

Regional District of Nanaimo board will be almost all new

Only 3-4 directors out of 19 returning to RDN board table

Senior Whalers duke it out but suffer loss

Ballenas need to win last two games to make it to the playoffs

Paper delivery may be late in some areas Oct. 25

Please note delivery of the PQB News may be late in some… Continue reading

RDN gets three new faces for Area F, G and H

Salter, Gourlay and McLean take most votes for Regional District of Nanaimo directors

Surprise start to arts career for newly-arrived Qualicum Beach painter

From factory worker to commercial artist to teacher

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

VIDEO: Fire destroys historic small-town B.C. restaurant

Two people were injured as fire ripped through the Hedley restaurant around 2:30 a.m. Tuesday

B.C. town’s mayoral race a tie, come down to luck of the draw

Harry Gough led incumbent Cindy Fortin by one vote on election night Saturday

Outdoor retailer MEC vows to boost diversity after online complaint

Mountain Equipment Co-op was criticized for perpetuating a white-only picture of the outdoors

Trump vilifies caravan, says he’ll cut Central American aid

Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the Guatemala-Mexico border, about 5,000 Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the U.S. border Sunday in southern Mexico.

Federal carbon tax rebates will exceed the cost for most people affected

Officials say 70 per cent of people in those provinces will get back more than they end up paying out as fuel costs rise to incorporate the carbon tax.

Rotating strike in Toronto will have ‘significant impact,’ says Canada Post

Canada Post union announces rotating strikes in four Canadian cities.

Cancelling Saudi Arabia arms deal would cost $1 billion: Trudeau

Canada has added its voice to global calls for answers, with Trudeau telling the CBC in an interview today that the Saudi government’s explanation of what happened lacks credibility.

Former B.C. sheriff caught in sex-related sting pleads guilty to lesser charge

Kevin Johnston will be sentenced on Nov. 6 for his role in communicating online with a person posing as a 14-year-old girl.

Most Read