March is Fraud Prevention Month

Fraud costs individuals - and the country as a whole - more than one might think

March is anti-fraud month for the RCMP — and for very good reason.

Fraud-related offences are now thought to be as profitable as drug-related offences, estimated at between $10 and $30 billion annually in Canada by the RCMP’s Commercial Crime Branch.

The majority of these crimes aren’t committed by children at their computers,  but rather, much of the work is conducted by criminal organizations.

Fraud should concern all Canadians because it de-stabilizes the national economy while strengthening organized crime groups. The impact on individuals, families and businesses is devastating: retirement savings, homes, businesses — and in some cases, lives — have all been lost.

The only good news is that the majority of frauds can be prevented by identifying the methods used by fraudsters.

The more you know about a fraud, the less likely you are to become a victim of it.

Fraud Prevention Month is an annual event that gives private and public organizations involved in the fight against fraud an opportunity to further raise public awareness.

While the spotlight is on fraud during the month of March, it’s important to be vigilant about it all year long.

Being cautious isn’t something to be ashamed of. Whether you’re shielding your PIN number from view or asking questions of telemarketers, don’t be afraid of offending people who are asking for your money, says RCMP Superintendent Steve Foster, Director of the RCMP Commercial Crime Branch.

Over the next four weeks, the RCMP will be participating in a series of local and national fraud-awareness initiatives.

 

To help reduce your chances of being victimized by fraud, check the RCMP’s website daily during the month of March for tips aimed at keeping you safe from scammers. Topics covered will include identity theft, phishing, on-line shopping, social networking and credit and debit card fraud.