A dump truck works near the Syncrude oil sands extraction facility near the city of Fort McMurray, Alta., on June 1, 2014. The parliamentary budget office says most Canadian households will receive more money back from the federal government’s carbon-tax scheme than it will cost them. The assertion is contained in a report published by the PBO this morning, nearly four months after a majority of Canadian voters cast their ballots in favour of parties that favoured a carbon tax. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Most Canadian households will get more than they pay from carbon tax: PBO

Alberta will receive more than it loses, the report says

The parliamentary budget office says most Canadian households will receive more money back from the federal government’s carbon-tax scheme than it will cost them.

The assertion is contained in a report published by the PBO this morning, nearly four months after a majority of Canadian voters cast their ballots in favour of parties that favoured a carbon tax.

The report says the rebates provided by the federal government to most households in Canada will exceed the amount those same households will have paid in carbon tax.

In the case of Alberta, which has been ground-zero for opposition to the federal carbon tax, the report says every household will receive more in annual rebates from Ottawa than it pays.

However, the report adds that finding does not take into account the province’s own regulations for high-intensity emitters.

The PBO report also says Ottawa will end up raising about $100 million in this fiscal year in additional GST because of the added cost on products from carbon pricing, a figure that will triple by 2022-23.

READ MORE: ‘Greatest existential threat of our time:’ Ottawa makes carbon tax case in court

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

carbon tax

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Brody Peterson told The Gazette he intends to dispute tickets issued by Grand Forks RCMP at his backyard “house warming” Saturday, Oct. 10. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Brody Peterson told The Gazette he intends to dispute tickets issued by Grand Forks RCMP at his backyard “house warming” Saturday, Oct. 10. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Grand Forks RCMP recommend criminal charges after weekend party

Homeowner Brody Peterson said he’ll dispute tickets for refusing police instructions, alleged COVID violations

Greg Duerksen and his family. (gofundme photo)
Qualicum Beach firefighter prepares for stem cell transplant

Friends rally to help raise funds for Duerksen family

Cathy Stewart is currently the featured artist at the Qualicum Art and Supply Gallery, through the end of October. (Mandy Moraes photo)
Artist Cathy Stewart has paintings on display at two Qualicum Beach exhibits

‘With patience and determination you can do anything’

Jennifer Bate, executive director of Parksville’s McMillan Arts Centre, visits the PQB News/VI Free Daily studio. (Peter McCully photo)
PQBeat: A chat with Jennifer Bate of Parksville’s McMillan Arts Centre

Podcast: Discussion includes COVID-19 issues, singing in a rock band and more

FILE – People wait in line at a COVID-19 testing facility in Burnaby, B.C., on Thursday, August 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
167 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death recorded as B.C. enters 2nd wave

Three new healthcare outbreaks also announced

A glimpse of some of the 480 (approx) cars written off as a result of the acid spills along the Trail highway in 2018. Photo: Trail Times
Kootenay Ford dealer’s frustration grows with ICBC

Trail AM Ford owner Dan Ashman says he just wants fair compensation from ICBC

Mail-in ballot from Elections BC (Katya Slepian/Black Press Media)
At least 26% of eligible voters have already cast a ballot, Elections BC says

Voters can cast a ballot until 8 p.m PST on Election Day

A 2018 decision to fly a rainbow flag ended up costing the City of Langley $62,000 in legal fees (Langley Advance Times file)
Human rights win in rainbow flag fight cost B.C. city $62,000

“Lengthy and involved” process provoked by complaint

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is seen during a news conference Tuesday October 20, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau and his family decide against trick-or-treating this year due to COVID

Adhering to local health authorities, Trudeau urges Canadians to do their part in following those guidelines

Surrey RCMP cruisers outside a Newton townhouse Tuesday night. (Photo: Shane MacKichan)
Toddler in hospital, woman dead following stabbings at Surrey townhouse

Police say two-year-old was among victims found at townhouse complex in the 12700-block of 66 Avenue

A Tim Hortons employee hands out coffee from a drive-through window to a customer in Mississauga, Ont., on March 17, 2020. Tim Hortons is ending the practice of double cupping hot drinks, a move the fast food restaurant says will eliminate hundreds of millions of cups from landfills each year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
The end of double cupping: Tim Hortons ditches two cups in favour of one with sleeve

Most recycling facilities in Canada don’t recycle single use paper coffee cups because of a plastic lining

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer doctor Theresa Tam responds to a question during a news conference Tuesday October 20, 2020 in Ottawa. Canada’s chief public health doctor says in the age of social media, fake news about the COVID-19 pandemic has been spreading faster than the virus itself. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
VIDEO: Fake news creates serious issues for battling pandemic, chief public health doc says

Both Tam and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau urged Canadians to be responsible about the information they share

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Most Read