BC Assessment has released the 2018 property assessments and have identified the highest assessed values from all over the Island. This home at 460 Judges Row in Qualicum Beach is worth $3,928,000. — Lauren Collins photo

Nanoose Bay property tops list of most expensive in region

Property valued at $12,418,000 leads top 10 in Parksville Qualicum Beach area

Three Nanoose Bay properties made the list of top 100 most expensive residential real estate in Vancouver Island.

BC Assessment released its 2018 property assessments and have identified the highest assessed values from all over the Island as of July 1, 2017.

Leading the way in the Parksville Qualicum Beach region is an acreage in the Beachcomber area in Nanoose Bay, on 1365 Dorcas Point Rd., valued at $12,418,000. It is ranked sixth overall behind the highest-ranked valued property in Vancouver Island, James Island, which is worth $53,279,000.

The other Nanoose Bay properties included in the top 100 are 1274 Dorcas Point Road, at $6,722,000, and 1574 Stewart Rd., at $6,331,000.

The only property outside Nanoose Bay that made the top 100 list is a Qualicum Beach waterfront acreage on 821 Eaglecrest Drive carrying a price tag of $6,735,000.

Most of the expensive homes in the Parksville Qualicum Beach region are located in Qualicum Beach, according to BC Assessment.

Here are the top valued homes in the region that didn’t make the top 100: 2247 Island Hwy. W, Qualicum Beach ($5,170,000); 2119 Island Hwy. W, Qualicum Beach ($4,847,000); 460 Judges Row, Qualicum Beach ($3,928,000); 382 Judges Row, Qualicum Beach ($3,841,000); 302 Hall Rd., Qualicum Beach ($3,366,000); 323 Hall Rd., Qualicum Beach ($3,311,000); 864 Gaetjen St., Parksville ($2,630,000); 366 Judges Row, Qualicum Beach ($2,549,000); 900 Seacrest Pl., Qualicum Beach ($2,527,000).

Those wishing to see their 2018 assessments can now do so online at www.bcassessment.ca.

Most owners in Parksville Qualicum Beach can expect an increase in the value of their residential properties according to BC Assessment. Property values in both municipalities will go up 22 per cent, on average. In Parksville, the benchmark assessment has gone from $361,000 to $440,000, and in Qualicum Beach from $449,000 to $546,00. In rural Oceanside, the average assessed value will go up 19 per cent or from $440,000 to $524,000 on average.

While admitting the soaring values may be alarming and concerning to some property owners, BC Assessor Tina Ireland said in a press release that “increases in property assessments do not automatically translate into a corresponding increase in property taxes.

“How your assessment changes relative to the average change in your community is what may affect your property taxes.”

Those interested may visit BC Assessment’s website at www.bcassessment.ca and use the search function to see their own assessments and others in their neighbourhood. Those with questions or concerns are asked to call B.C. Assessment at 1-866-825-8322.

Send story tips to:

michael.briones@pqbnews.com

Just Posted

Ravensong Waterdancers perform well at regional meet

Mable Moran Regional Championships held in Richmond

UPDATE: Police rule out alcohol, distraction in fatal crash in Nanoose

Passenger of fatal crash still in critical condition following crash in Nanoose Bay on Friday

Refugee family meets supporters at Parksville’s Ascension Church

MP calls congregation’s efforts an “inspiring story for all Canadians”

MLA Stilwell chairing B.C. Liberals’ new affordability committee

Opposition thinking about election readiness

Qualicum Beach approves waterfront mobile vendor licences

Waterfront will have multiple food vendors this summer

UPDATED: 9 killed, 16 injured after van hits pedestrians in Toronto

Toronto police say nine people have died and 16 are injured

Parksville resident interrupts break and enter

Two reported break and entries on Gaetjen Street

Judith Guichon steps down as Lieutenant Governor of B.C.

Election decision didn’t make her best moments from the past six years

Vancouver to rake in $30 million in empty homes tax in first year

The tax is the first of its kind in Canada, and was intended to address the city’s near-zero vacancy rate

LGBTQ advocates turn Victoria SOGI protest into dance party

Counter-protest outnumbers anti-SOGI activists on lawn of B.C. legislature

B.C.’s snowpack continues to increase, melting delayed

River Forecast Centre official says sudden melting further into the season could cause flooding

Dashwood VFD hosting annual head shave

Money raised goes toward cancer research

Another B.C. First Nation voices support for Kinder Morgan pipeline

Simpcw First Nation claims people living on one-third of pipeline route support the project

Most Read