Fairwinds retained its designation as a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary.

Fairwinds retained its designation as a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary.

Nanoose Bay’s Fairwinds Golf Club is a sanctuary

Club has retained its certification from Audubon International

  • Sep. 18, 2014 12:00 p.m.

Fairwinds Golf Club has retained its designation as a “Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary” through the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for Golf Courses, an Audubon International program.

According to a news release issued by Fairwinds, participation is designed to help course personnel plan, organize, implement and document a comprehensive environmental management program and receive recognition for their efforts. To reach certification, a course must demonstrate that they are maintaining a high degree of environmental quality in a number of areas.

“Fairwinds Golf Club has shown a strong commitment to its environmental program. They are to be commended for their efforts to provide a sanctuary for wildlife on the golf course property,” said Doug Bechtel, executive director of Audubon International.

Fairwinds Golf Club is one of 12 courses in British Columbia to receive the honour. The golf course was designated as a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary in 2009. After designation, courses go through a recertification process every two years.

This year the recertification process, coordinated by Rick Munro, assistant superintendent at Fairwinds, required a visit by a local community representative. Michael Girard, instructor and chair of the horticulture technician program at VIU, was given a tour of the course and sent his observations to Audubon International.

“Fairwinds Golf Club appears to be doing an excellent job of environmental stewardship to meet the requirements of the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program,” Girard reported.

Audubon International is a not-for-profit environmental education organization.

Fairwinds Golf Club is a par 71, Les Furber-designed 18-hole course located in Nanoose Bay. For more information, visit www.fairwinds.ca.

— Submitted By Fairwinds

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