The province has authorized grizzly and black bear hunting

NHLer Clayton Stoner caught in grizzly bear hunting controversy

Stoner – from Port McNeill – appears in photos online, showing him posing with a severed grizzly bear head and paws.

B.C.-born hockey player Clayton Stoner is the latest athlete caught in an animal hunting controversy.

Photos have emerged online, showing Stoner posing with the severed head of a grizzly bear, and decked out in camouflage fatigues. The image is believed to have been taken in May, 2013, by field technicians in B.C.’s Kwatna estuary.

The bear’s nickname was ‘Cheeky’, and it was being documented by filmmakers from Coastal First Nations (CFN), who have developed a PSA to end bear hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest. Last year, the CFN banned bear hunting on its territories.

(The film is being screened this morning – Wednesday, Sept. 4 – at Telus World of Science.)

“I grew up hunting and fishing in British Columbia and continue to enjoy spending time with my family outdoors,” Stoner said in a statement released by his NHL club, the Minnesota Wild.

“I applied for and received a grizzly bear hunting license through a British Columbia limited entry lottery last winter and shot a grizzly bear with my licence while hunting with my father, uncle and a friend in May.

“I love to hunt and fish and will continue to do so with my family and friends in British Columbia.”

The bear’s paws were also found severed, according to CFN, and the animal was skinned and its remains found left to rot (*graphic photos below).

Stoner, who played his first full season with the Wild last year, is from Port McNeill, B.C.

Jessie Housty, a councillor with the Heilstuk First Nation, said Clayton identified himself with the makers of the CFN’s film, and said the PSA focuses on the hunted – not the hunters.

“We are not profiling any hunters in the film,” she told The Globe and Mail‘s Andrea Woo and Wendy Stueck. “The issue for us is the broader hunting culture in B.C., not vilifying particular hunters.”

The Globe also said black and grizzly bear hunting is authorized in British Columbia, and the CFN has been asked (by the province) to respect its authority over the bear hunt.

————————————————————

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Clayton Stoner Bear Hunt

Just Posted

A very cheesy Christmas at Little Qualicum Cheeseworks

Annual family Christmas event, this year with raclette hot off the melting wheel

PQB crime report: Thieves pilfer cash, root beer and hand sanitizer

Oceanside RCMP receive 249 complaints in one-week period

Solutions in sight for Parksville Qualicum Beach doctor shortage

With feasibility study funded, group shares vision of ‘campus of healthcare’

Raise the curtains: New outdoor theatre coming to Parksville

A $204,000 boost comes from Island Coastal Economic Trust

VIDEO: SNL skewers Trudeau’s mockery of Trump in high school cafeteria sketch

The three world leaders won’t let Trump sit at the cool kids’ table

B.C. universities post $340 million worth of surpluses thanks to international student tuition

Students call for spending as international enrolment produces huge surpluses at many universities

Conservatives urge Morneau to deliver ‘urgent’ fall economic update

Morneau says the first thing the Liberals plan to do is bring in their promised tax cut for the middle class

INFOGRAPHIC: How much money did your local university or college make last year?

B.C. university and colleges posted a combined $340 million surplus in 2018/19

B.C. creates $8.5M organization to improve safety for health care workers

Group will bring together unions, province, health care organizations

Kovrig clings to humour as ‘two Michaels’ near one year in Chinese prison

Their detention is widely viewed as retaliation for Canada’s arrest of Chinese high-tech scion Meng Wanzhou

B.C. VIEWS: An engine that hums right along

First Nations are leading a new surge of investment in B.C.

Brain injury from domestic abuse a ‘public health crisis,’ says B.C. researcher

Nearly 80% of the domestic violence victims who reported to police last year were women

Most Read