Planters and banners coming to Orange Bridge area of Parksville

Other discussions at Monday night's council meeting included a neighbourhood concern about a retaining wall and fence

Businesses near the Orange Bridge in Parksville will get a hand up from the city as they try to raise the profile and beautify their area of the community.

Council passed a motion Monday night to give the merchants some un-used concrete planter boxes and erect some street-light banners still to be developed by the merchants. Staff estimated the cost to the city in employee time and materials would cost the city less than $400. A representative of the Orange Bridge merchants recently made a pitch to council, asking for permission — not any taxpayer funds — to spruce up their area of the city.

There were some concerns expressed by at least one councillor Monday night that this type of marketing might fracture the city.

“The concern was we would have banners all over the city, dividing the community,” said Coun. Sue Powell.

Coun. Carrie Powell-Davidson said she wasn’t concerned about that possibility and was supportive of the efforts of the Orange Bridge merchants.

“I really hope we are setting a precedent,” said Powell-Davidson.

The planters will be delivered to the merchants, which will go on private land and be planted and maintained by the merchants. The city will erect a couple of banners, which will be designed and purchased by the merchants but will have to be approved by council.

Other council news from Monday:

• Coun. Al Greir put forward a successful motion directing staff to have a look at how the city approves fences on top of retaining walls after he heard from some Humphrey Road residents.

Council heard a new-home development followed all the city’s rules when it put a five-foot-six-inch fence on top of a four-foot retaining wall.

“These people (neighbours) are very upset and rightly so, I agree with them,” said Greir. “I wouldn’t want to live under those conditions.” He likened the view from the backyard of an existing, neighbouring home to that of a “prison.”

Staff said the developers did not break any rules in the construction of the fence-wall combo, and the wall related to drainage of the site. Staff will come back to council with recommendations on how to deal with similar situations in the future.

• Council passed two readings of a zoning and development ammendment bylaw related to a development at the corner of Lombardy Street and the Island Highway.

A public hearing on the development is set for June 16 at 6 p.m. at city hall. Garwin Wuerch of Radcliffe Development Corporation gave city council its first look at the 29-unit (plus retail) plan in mid-March. At that time, council expressed concerns about access to the underground parking from 19A, but otherwise had glowing comments about the development, which would replace what’s been called “boarded-up hotel in disrepair.”

Positive comments about the plan continued Monday night. Wuerch held an open house related to the project April 17. Only seven residents attended only three comment sheets submitted, all positive, according to city staff.

Coun. Bill Neufeld said he attended the open house.

“I was really quite amazed at what the developer has put forward,” Neufeld said Monday night. “In the end, I think it’s going to be advantageous to have this new development in our city.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

RDN says water in French Creek still potable despite levels of iron, manganese

Strategy to improve water quality being established

COVID-19: City of Parksville to open offices on June 1

Health and safety restrictions will be in place

Program at Parksville’s McMillan Arts Centre offers chance to connect art, environmentalism

MAC program works to create community arts installation in city

Questions remain as summer tourism approaches in Parksville Qualicum Beach

COVID-19: Association hopes residents continue to support local businesses

‘A bottomless well of love for people and communities’

Parksville Qualicum Beach News editor JR Rardon dies at age 61

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

100-pound gargoyle stolen from backyard in Nanaimo’s south end

RCMP asking for any information about the statue’s whereabouts

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

Schools in Tahsis and Gold River will open on June 1, with 30 per cent students expected to come in

Most Read