Nanaimo-Ladysmith will elect a new member of Parliament today, May 6. NEWS BULLETIN photo

Polls open for Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection

Central Vancouver Island riding has been without representation since January

One last byelection in B.C. will happen before the fall’s general federal election.

The polls opened to voters at 8:30 a.m. on Monday in Nanaimo-Ladysmith, and will stay open until 8:30 p.m.

Candidatesinclude Bob Chamberlin, NDP; Jennifer Clarke, People’s Party of Canada; Michelle Corfield, Liberals; John Hirst, Conservatives; Paul Manly, Green Party; and Brian Marlatt, Progressive Canadian Party. Jakob Letkemann is on the ballot but the National Citizens Alliance has announced that he no longer represents that party.

The Nanaimo-Ladysmith riding became vacant when Sheila Malcolmson resigned to successfully run for Nanaimo MLA.

EDITORIAL: Nanaimo-Ladysmith has the attention of all parties, so go vote

RELATED: Parties make their last push before Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection

At an all-candidates’ meeting last week, the six candidates attempted to distinguish themselves and their parties and make an appeal to voters.

Chamberlin said through his work as vice-president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, he’s a known quantity in Ottawa and the best-positioned candidate to be able to get things done in a short stint in Parliament. He talked about affordable housing, pharmacare, childcare and a clean alternative energy plan.

“The NDP are committed to developing and implementing that and seeing good-paying jobs come about as we develop that infrastructure and make the switch from the carbon-burning fuels that we’ve become too accustomed to,” he said. “The Earth cannot tolerate it anymore.”

Corfield said Nanaimo-Ladysmith needs to create meaningful employment for graduates. She said there needs to be continued investment in transportation and infrastructure and said that’s happening now with the Liberals. She highlighted the government’s oceans protection plan and national housing strategy, initiatives for seniors, and the work being done toward pharmacare.

“We need to be able to have someone in government so we can advocate for what Nanaimo needs most,” Corfield said.

Manly said Canada needs a government that will take responsibility for the climate crisis rather than ask consumers to change their behaviour, and one that will stop subsidizing the fossil fuel industry.

He said electing the NDP, Liberals or Conservatives will mean an MP who will toe the party line from the backbenches.

“If you elect me, we are going to fire up this country and we are going to get some things done because they are going to notice that people in Nanaimo-Ladysmith care about climate change, you care about the next generation, you care about the future,” Manly said. “It’s important what we do here.”

Hirst said his party can offer effective government and as MP he would be able to help the lives of constituents. Hirst said the NDP has shown a lack of results for the riding, the Green platform is based on emotion, and the Liberals will increase taxes and debt.

“If the latest polls are to be believed, we will have a Conservative government this fall and if I’m elected as your MP, I will deliver results,” he said. “We will have a voice at the table to help form federal policy before the fall.”

Clarke said her party wants to stop irresponsible and wasteful spending, curb divisive “identity politics” and put an end to corporate welfare.

“There has been a steady erosion of our core values by our own government,” she said. “Our country has never been as divided as it is right now, both culturally and economically.”

Marlatt said his party would work for the betterment of all Canadians equally, rather than appeal to what he called the politics of regionalism and movements.

“The Progressive Canadian Party is a party of progressive conservatives, or Tories who look to the principles of Sir John A. Macdonald and the progressive conservative balance of progressive social policy, fiscal responsibility and political economy and of nation building,” Marlatt said.

For links to previous byelection coverage in the Nanaimo News Bulletin, click here.

For information about Nanaimo-Ladysmith federal riding boundaries, click here.

To read about the candidates’ priorities in their own words, click here.



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Controversial SD69 discussions continue regarding field trips requiring air travel

Some Qualicum district students believe motion takes away too much from experience at school

Pole-climbing thieves pilfering wire in Parksville Qualicum Beach area

Repairs are costly and thefts jeopardize public safety

Library month celebrates Indigenous people, culture in Parksville

Vancouver Island Regional Library showcasing culture of many Nations during October

Green Party leader Elizabeth May talks eliminating fish farming in open ocean pens

May stops in Qualicum Beach as part of Island campaign

Qualicum Beach council discusses helping out Orca Place residents

Town considers offer of temporary jobs in the future

Fashion Fridays: 5 things to remove from your closet

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Kawhi Leonard, former Toronto Raptor, welcomed back to Vancouver at pre-season game

Fans go wild at pre-season game between L.A. Clippers and Dallas Mavericks at Rogers Arena

Greens and NDP go head to head on West Coast; Scheer takes fight to Bernier

Trudeau turns focus to key ridings outside Toronto after two days in Quebec

Scooter rider suffers life-threatening injuries in crash in Nanaimo

One person airlifted to hospital in Victoria after collision on Wall Street on Thursday

Campbell River homicide suspects arrested in Vancouver

Two men remain in custody, but have not been charged

Canucks beat Stanley Cup champs 4-3 in a shootout

Leivo nets winner, Vancouver dumps St. Louis for fourth straight win

Scholars say religious vaccine objections can’t be traced to Biblical sources

Vaccinations are a requirement to attend class in Ontario and New Brunswick, while B.C. launched a demand this fall

‘The more you test, the more you find’: Beef recalls a sign of success, experts say

Despite appearances, experts say a recent rise in major recalls is not a sign of food supply problems

ELECTION 2019: How would the major parties address Canada’s housing crisis?

Promises include speculation taxes, more affordable housing, and declaring housing a human right

Most Read