FILE. (The Associated Press)

Rules on nicotine content, advertising, flavours for vaping come into effect in B.C.

Previously announced measures aimed at reducing vaping among youth

The province announced Monday (July 20) that strict regulations for vaping will come into effect for immediately.

The rules, some of which have been previously announced in November, include limiting nicotine to 20 milligrams/millilitre. Health Minister Adrian Dix said that amount would bring nicotine content per pod to the amount in 20 cigarettes, which would match European Union standards. Dix said the EU has done a better job of controlling vaping among young people.

Vaping products in B.C. are not allowed to be sold to youth under the age of 19, however, Dix said there has been an “exponential growth in their use” among young people.

He blamed an “aggressive campaign over time to promote vaping products among youth,” noting that youth vaping is linked to a sevenfold increase in the chances of smoking cigarettes as an adult.

Education Minister Rob Fleming said vaping companies “disguise toxins with harmless sounding flavours like cotton candy.”

The sale of non-tobacco flavours will be restricted to adult-only stores, while all vaping products will have plain packaging with health warnings on them. New stores will have to bring in these changes immediately while existing retailers will have until Sept. 15.

Advertising for vaping products will also be restricted in areas where youth spend significant time, including at bus stops and in malls.

Dix said the rules were meant to go into effect at the end of March but the province chose to delay to focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. The provincial tax on vaping products was increased to 20 per cent on Jan. 1.

“This is a necessary public health step to protect young people from vaping,” Dix said.

In addition, Fleming said the province’s plans include a youth-led anti-vaping social media campaign was launched in February. Dubbed the “evaporate” campaign,” the province said it’s garnered over 27 million digital impressions.

When Dix asked if there were worries about increased regulations sparking a black market, the health minister said people under the age of 18 are already buying vaping products, and the nicotine requirements will hopefully make them less potent.

“It is not allowed now but has occurred nonetheless,” he said.

However, the province’s new regulations came under fire from the Convenience Industry Council of Canada, a group that represents convenience stores in the country.

The council said the rules were misguided and “dangerous public policy.”

“All the available evidence shows that convenience stores outperform specialty retail shops in the responsible retailing of age-restricted products,” the council said in a statement. It cited a Centre for Addiction and Mental Health report released in 2019 that showed convenience stores were among “the least common source of vaping products for youth,” although the study was carried out in Ontario.

READ MORE: B.C. to restrict nicotine content, bring in 20% tax on vaping products


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

vaping

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Black Press file photo)
Parksville Qualicum Beach crime report: Bank discovers counterfeit Canadian currency

Oceanside RCMP received 249 complaints in one-week period

Jordan Jay Ward, 20, is wanted Canada-wide for manslaughter. (Calgary police photo)
UPDATE: ‘Suspicious’ man seen in Parksville woods not manslaughter suspect

Hikers say he resembled Jordan Jay Ward, wanted Canada-wide

From left: BC NDP candidate Adam Walker; BC Liberal Party candidate Michelle Stilwell. (Submitted/file)
B.C. VOTES 2020: Parksville-Qualicum candidates wait for mail-in ballot count

NDP’s Adam Walker has lead over B.C. Liberal Party’s Michelle Stilwell

An illustration was given to the Parksville’s Church of the Ascension by a person, in appreciation for allowing use of its shower facility. (Mike Favero/Submitted photo)
Parksville church makes showers available to the homeless

Pastor receives special illustration from one appreciative person

Dr. Richard Stanwick, Island Health chief medical health officer, immunizes Victoria Schmid, Island Health’s vice-president of pandemic planning. (Submitted photo)
Island Health advising people to get a flu shot

People looking to get vaccinated should book an appointment, says Island Health

FILE – Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides the latest update on the COVID-19 pandemic in the province during a press conference in the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, October 22, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. shatters COVID-19 records with 817 weekend cases; masks now expected indoors

Three people have died over the past three reporting periods

The voting station mimicked a real voting station in Nicole Choi’s classroom at Chilliwack middle school on Oct. 22, 2020, where students had to show their ID (student cards), be checked off a list, and mark a secret ballot behind a screen. (Jessica Peters/ Chilliwack Progress)
B.C. students choose NDP majority in mock election

More than 90,000 youth took part in school-based election process

Crew transport bus at the Trans Mountain pipeline project work site in Burnaby, March 2020. (Trans Mountain)
Check your workplace COVID-19 safety plans, Dr. Henry urges

Masks in public spaces, distance in lunchrooms for winter

B.C.’s Court of Appeal is in Vancouver. (File photo: Tom Zytaruk)
Judgment reserved in Surrey Six slayings appeals

Six men were killed in suite 1505 of the Balmoral Tower in Whalley on Oct. 19, 2007

Kelowna City Hall has been vandalized overnight. (Michael Rodriguez - Capital News)
Kelowna City Hall hit by anti-pandemic vandalism

Graffiti condemning the virus appears overnight on City Hall

FILE – A woman smokes a marijuana joint at a “Wake and Bake” legalized marijuana event in Toronto on October 17, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov
Home nurse visits could play big role in reducing cannabis use, smoking in young mothers

The program, dubbed the BC Healthy Connections Project, involves public health nursing home visits

Candice Woloshyn prepares her flower beds for the next season at her ‘Dirty Girl Flowers’ farm in Merville. Despite the pandemic, Woloshyn was able to sustain her homegrown business as community members opted for regular deliveries of fresh cut flowers. Photo by Binny Paul/ Campbell River Mirror.
Vancouver Island flower farmers were blooming as the pandemic wilted everything else

Floriculturists saw increased subscriptions as fresh flowers became a ‘sight for sore eyes’ during isolation

The ‘new normal’ for hockey parents in Chilliwack and elsewhere in B.C., watching their kids from outside of the arena due to COVID-19 protocols. (Submitted photo)
Chilliwack hockey parents petition to be let back in the arena

Refused access due to pandemic protocols, parents are now applying pressure to loosen the rules

Most Read