Scott Tanner eyes council comeback

Former councillor says he has much to contribute

Scott Tanner says he offers the voice of experience for the new council.

If there’s one thing Scott Tanner believes he offers voters in the current municipal election campaign in Qualicum Beach, it’s experience.

He offers more than that of course, but, with a high number of council incumbents opting to pursue other projects this time around, the former councillor feels that experience could prove important.

“I served for six years on council, was the past chair of the advisory planning commission and I am currently a director of the Qualicum Beach Residents Association.”

Perhaps as important, or even more important, he said, has been his continuing presence at just about every council meeting, public hearing or debate.

“I am very familiar with pretty much all the issues council has faced, especially within the last year. I think that’s critical. There is a learning curve and when you are first elected you spend a lot of your time familiarizing yourself with the various issues and it does take a while to get a handle on them.”

Tanner said his attendance at municipal functions shows not only his extensive knowledge about community issues and concerns, but also shows his dedication to serving the community.

Tanner, who describes himself as a free-enterpriser, said he wants to make sure taxpayers get good value for their money.

“That’s first and foremost,” he said. “Council will always be challenged to seek ways to improve town operations and reduce costs, but one has to remember the town is in the business of providing public services and there’s a balance there, between what degree of public service is expected for the tax dollars paid.”

Another issue Tanner wants to push is the need to keep the local high school, Kwalikum Secondary, open and thriving.

“I took an active role with the Oceanside Committee for Quality Education,” he said. “The KSS issue was a real wakeup call for Qualicum Beach and people now realize how critical it is as a community asset. If that high school was to go and the students transferred to Parksville, that would be a disaster for Qualicum Beach.”

Tanner said concerns raised about development in Qualicum Beach are valid, but he stressed that forces beyond those wielded by municipal officials have a large role to play in what gets built and what sits idle.

Tanner said he completely supports the town’s vision statement about promoting the simple pleasures of life.

 

“That describes Qualicum Beach,” he said.

 

 

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