Survey suggests 67 per cent of Qualicum Beach residents agree Pheasant Glen’s proposed development is good for community

Pheasant Glen owners commissioned the poll, which gathered 303 responses by phone Aug. 6-10

  • Aug. 27, 2014 12:00 p.m.

Results are being released from a recent phone survey of Qualicum Beach residents that claim 67 per cent of respondents agree the proposed Pheasant Glen Resort development will be good for the community.

Pheasant Glen is owned by the Dutton family of Qualicum Beach. Craig Dutton said the resort commissioned the survey, which was conducted by phone by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner from Aug. 6-10. Dutton said the survey is accurate to within 5.7 percentage points, plus or minus, 19 times out of 20. Dutton also said the poll’s data was gathered from the responses of 303 Qualicum Beach residents.

Dutton released the data from only one question on Wednesday. He said the question was worded this way: “The Pheasant Glen project, as proposed, will add 200 residents, a new clubhouse restaurant and an event pavilion. The estimated economic benefit is approximately $35 million to the local economy. Do you agree or disagree that a project like this will be good for Qualicum Beach?”

The results released by Dutton pertaining to that question stated that 43 per cent of respondents “strongly agree” and 24 per cent “somewhat agree.” It also revealed that 16 per cent “strongly disagree” and nine per cent “somewhat disagree.” Two per cent neither agreed or disagreed and six per cent said they either don’t know or refused to answer.

Dutton said more details from the survey are expected to be released in the next few days. See Tuesday’s edition of The NEWS for the story.

On its website, New York City-based Greenberg Quinlan Rosner says it is “one of the world’s premier research and strategic consulting firms. We specialize in political polling and campaign strategy, helping political candidates, parties, advocacy groups, and ballot initiatives succeed across the United States and around the globe.”

According to its website, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner’s client list has included Microsoft, Boeing, the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Cubs. The company says it employs nearly 70 research professionals and has offices in Washington, D.C., New York, N.Y., Buenos Aires, Argentina and London, England.

— NEWS Staff

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