Victims grant may miss needy parents due to eligibility rules: report

Only 29 of 50 applicants between 2013 and 2017 received the grant across Canada, a federal report says

A newly released report says a federal grant for parents of murdered and abducted children may be inadvertently failing to provide important financial help to those who are “more vulnerable economically.”

The federal evaluation, made public today, cautions against drawing any hard conclusions from the numbers, given how few parents have applied for and received the grant since it launched in January 2013.

Only 29 of 50 applicants between 2013 and 2017 received the grant, and they were predominantly female and living in urban areas mainly in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta.

The evaluation, which was finalized in December, says rejected applicants tended to be single and unemployed people who earned less income during the year before the incident, compared with those parents who received the grant.

The report also cites interviews with police, government and victims services officials who say Indigenous Peoples living on reserve don’t know about the program.

Since its launch in 2013, the program has spent less than one per cent of its annual $10 million budget on grants, which the evaluation chalks up to a variety of issues, including strict eligibility criteria.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Development, taxes and 222 Corfield discussed at Parksville all candidates meeting

All candidates met on Oct. 11 to answer the public’s questions before the Oct. 20 election

Inspiring Qualicum Beach teacher suddenly passes away

English teacher and counsellor Carol Myhre remembered as ‘source of joy’: superintendent

Qualicum district students to develop experiments that could head into space

Youngsters compete to have designs reach International Space Station

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Rick Mercer says pot is ‘excruciatingly boring’

Comedian hopes Canadians will move onto something else once marijuana is legalized

Defence cautions against mob justice in Calgary child neglect trial

Jennifer and Jeromie Clark of Calgary have pleaded not guilty to criminal negligence causing death

Feds eyeing options to expedite pardons for minor pot convictions

Internal discussions have focused on an application-based process for speeding up pot pardons

Island pot smokers won’t be allowed to light up on the ski hill

Mount Washington maintains smoke-free policy in light of marijuana legalization

U.S. pot firms urge Trump to dominate North American marijuana industry

Cannabis producers claim the U.S. is “rapidly losing” its competitive advantage to Canada

Battle resumes over speculation tax on B.C. vacant homes

Opposition calls it ‘fake’ tax that is reducing housing supply

Around the BCHL: Merritt, Chilliwack and Coquitlam early-season surprises

Around the BCHL is a look at what’s going on in the league and throughout the junior A world.

Federal government tables bill to transform prisoner segregation

Administrative and disciplinary segregation will be eliminated by Ottawa

Most Read