Eagles in their nest in a French Creek Douglas fir, which was almost cut down in 2019. (Save French Creek Estuary Land photo)

WATCH: Eagles return to French Creek tree saved from chopping block

Frankie the eaglet’s parents come back, have two babies

There are two new baby eagles in French Creek, born into a home that was almost demolished last year.

The Douglas fir tree nest where the eaglets and their parents now reside was dubbed inactive last year and the land was set to be developed. The province issued a permit allowing the property owner to cut down the tree, but that was later suspended once it was shown that eagles were brooding in the tree.

Save French Creek Estuary Land, a local conservation group, worked to get the permit suspended.

READ MORE: Group aims to preserve French Creek tree

Part of their effort was documenting a pair of bald eagles who used the nest – their eaglet, Frankie, was first spotted on May 9, 2019, before fledging on July 12.

Frankie’s parents have now returned and the group captured them feeding their new babies.

Denise Foster, chair of the group, caught the eagles in their nest.

“It was pure joy, really, to just know that the nest almost came down and then to see the eagles have that opportunity to raise another family there and to see the two chicks,” she said. “We had seen a peek of one prior, and then that day we saw the two.”

For Foster, it shows the importance of the estuary and the need for it to be protected.

“The estuary is wildly important for wildlife, all kinds of species depend on them, they’re considered one of the most valuable – nature’s nurseries is how they’re referred to of all the ecological habitats that we have,” she said. “So this particular estuary without any protection, in comparison to the Englishman River, Qualicum, Nanaimo – so it deserves that type of protection.”

Although Foster is glad the group was able to save the tree, she points out that it’s not protected indefinitely – it’s something they’re still working on protecting further.

“We’re still working through a Freedom of Information document that we put in a request for from the province,” she said. “We have that now and we’ll be submitting that to a renowned and published tree expert, who will be reviewing it for us to see in terms of the validity, the necessity of having the tree come down.”

Foster has been going through the FOI – she said part of the document shows correspondence where their request was referred to as a “conspiracy theory” by members of the public.

“Without public involvement, this bald eagle nest would have been cut down,” she said. “It’s not really a conspiracy theory, it’s just people showing care and concern for wildlife.”

cloe.logan@pqbnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter 

EnvironmentNatureParksville

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Iconic white raven returns to Parksville Qualicum Beach area

Photographer John Domovich: ‘It blew me away when I first observed it’

Vancouver Island’s current COVID-19 case count officially hits zero

Of the 130 recorded Island Health cases, five people have died, 125 recovered

Qualicum Beach man arrested over racist incident at Tseshaht First Nation

Port Alberni RCMP said the man turned himself in

COVID-19: City of Parksville announces gradual re-opening plan

Sports courts and playgrounds to open June 5

Search and rescue crews help locate 62-year-old Nanoose Bay mountain biker

RCMP: Man got lost on trail and did right thing by calling for assistance

MAP: Dr. Henry reveals which B.C. regions have seen most COVID-19 cases

B.C. health officials release a first look at how the novel coronavirus has reached all corners of the province

Pair accused of ‘horrific’ assault at Vancouver’s Oppenheimer Park at large

Police say Jason Tapp, 30, and Nicole Edwards, 33, did not show up to meet their bail supervisor this week

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

No charges to be laid against 22 northern B.C. pipeline protesters

Twenty-two people were arrested in February, but Crown has decided not to pursue charges

Parcel stolen from front porch, Nanaimo RCMP looking for suspect

Unidentified woman allegedly stole package containing $400 smart watch

‘I’m pissed, I’m outraged’: Federal minister calls out police violence against Indigenous people

Indigenous Minister Marc Miller spoke on recent incidents, including fatal shooting of a B.C. woman

Plan in place for BC Ferries to start increasing service levels

Ferry corporation reaches temporary service level agreement with province

B.C. starts to see employment return under COVID-19 rules

Jobless rate for young people still over 20% in May

Alert Bay resident carves tribute to his community kicking COVID-19’s butt

‘Our little village crushed the curve with love and commitment’

Most Read