A major shift

I agree with Mr. Hepworth Re: Pesticides have a very real job to do (The News, July 1, page A11) that homeowners need to be equipped with the necessary tools to maintain their lawns and gardens.

I agree with Mr. Hepworth Re: Pesticides have a very real job to do (The News, July 1, page A11) that homeowners need to be equipped with the necessary tools to maintain their lawns and gardens.

However, I would argue that these tools do not have to include the use of chemical pesticides, especially for cosmetic purposes.

Going pesticide free certainly does require a considerable shift, but it is more about the way we approach the maintenance of our green spaces, than how we treat pests.

There are many techniques that lower our lawn and garden’s susceptibility to weeds and pests such as overseeding our lawns, not overwatering, and using approaches such as selective planting. There are endless resources online, and in garden shops to help with the prevention of unwanted weeds and insects.

It is also important to remember that according to the Canadian Cancer Society, there is a growing body of evidence that links exposure to pesticides with an increased risk of cancer, especially among children. As a grandparent I prefer that governments take precautions, especially since these chemicals are being used for cosmetic purposes.

I congratulate the Town of Qualicum Beach for banning cosmetic pesticides and I encourage the City of Parksville and the B.C. government to follow suit. I want my grandchildren to be able to enjoy the beautiful green spaces of Parksville without the risk of being exposed to potentially hazardous pesticides.

Maureen Arnold, Parksville