A senior confesses

Not all pedestrian conflicts are the fault of those behind the wheel

In reply to Pat Murphy’s recent letter (‘Don’t cut me off’, The NEWS, July 16).

I confess being a senior pedestrian that prefers not  to use the walk lights at McMillan and Morison.

Once I push the button, I can either step back several feet and see if the light is flashing, or step off the sidewalk with no idea when it is safe to proceed or how much time is left. As a pedestrian, I get no feedback as there are no light indicators from my perspective.

The crossing on the other side of the street is not controlled so you run into all the hazards the light was suppose to remedy, with traffic coming from all directions.

If you get safely across towards the BMO, the sidewalk by the fire hydrant has a major slope towards the water, with a small patch of grass also sloping towards the building.  There is a significant gap between the sidewalk and the backfill, not noticeable if the grass is overgrown.

I took a serious fall and broke my shoulder at that spot. Other shops in the area have complained about the slope that was created by the upgrade.

I question how we got the cadillac road update, a  work of art to be sure, with an ill conceived,  impractical  functioning intersection.

A more modest choice might have afforded other seniors with a decent road and sidewalks in nearby streets.

Last year the city commissioned a study on “how seniors fall.’

The place I fell was a perfect example in what not to do. How much did that study cost taxpayers while the city disregarded the findings?

How much was paid to the adjuster the city hired who took months to study my case, only to lay all the blame on me. My request for $500 (with receipts) for emergency care was denied.

So much for caring about seniors.

Maria Maslovat

 

Parksville