Beach is no place for booze

There's a time and a place for everything, and as far as alcohol is concerned, the beach isn't it.

To say there is a time and a place for everything would probably not be accurate. However, within the bounds of good taste and the law, it could very well apply.

That is certainly the case with the consumption of alcohol and with displaying the behaviour that often accompanies it.

It’s hard to argue against the consumption of alcohol, nor would we particularly want to. Prohibition doesn’t work, as was evidenced in the 1920s with alcohol and with other substances today.

That said, a busy beach or crowded park during a hot summer day is probably not the time nor place for that kind of activity.

Surprising though it may seem, those other humanoid figures on said beach are actually other people, who probably don’t want to listen as you slur your way through the many reasons why you really don’t like your boss, why that last concert in Vancouver was so awesome or even how, really, he or she loves you guys.

In fact, quite the opposite is true. There are few things that can mar a family trip to the seaside more quickly and thoroughly than a bunch of yahooing drinkers giving overly loud vent to their inner alcohol.

It’s not too much to ask, surely, for people, if they want to imbibe, to do it away from other people and away from public places.

This isn’t really an issue of policing. The police may catch people who are intoxicated in public or they may not. It’s more a matter of self-control and consideration of other people.

Unless you own that beach — and can show a free and clear title to it upon request, it’s probably a good idea to leave the booze at home this summer and let the other people in the area continue to enjoy their good time together.

We don’t think it’s too much to ask.