Bleak outlook

I was disturbed by the content of the front page of the Dec. 1 edition of The NEWS

I was disturbed by the content of the front page of the Dec. 1 edition of The NEWS.

I have no argument with the opinions expressed or reported. Those who are in favour of fossil fuel terminals on the west coast and those against expanding existing facilities are equally right and wrong. The picture displayed alongside the lead front page article, tells the true story. In that picture one sees two compassionate people standing before a table laden with packaged Xmas gifts, intended for less well off recipients.

When imagination strips the scene of all products formed from fossil fuel wastes, and transported by fossil fuels during all the many sequences involved in production and distribution, all that’s left is a few clumps of natural fibre, and these too must vanish because their manufacture, would not have happened without some application of fossil fuel energy. Toys or clothing worn would vanish, and in all likelihood the human beings.

The world’s human population now stands at 7.4 billion. From 1960 there was not enough natural food growing habitats and systems on this small planet to promote an increase in human numbers of 4.5 billion. Fossil fuel consumption in multiple ways has given and still gives practically all humanity, living now, life and the sustenance needed to avoid death by extreme deprivation and unsatisfied wants. Fossil fuel, from before human conception occurs, until death stays demand, is the primary reason man now enjoys that which we term advanced civilization.

Sadly there is nothing to replace its demonized benefits. When genuine protestors march against fossil fuel extraction, processing or distribution, they must do so using the goods and services provided by the very thing they condemn. Ask any rightly convinced opponent to fossil fuel use to publically display commitment to principle, and remove from their persons all things contaminated with fossil fuels, any foolish enough to answer the challenge would be naked of clothing, footwear, cash mediums and transportation. Food provisions would be cast away because there is no food, including 99 per cent cultivated in personal gardens, which is not at some point been dependent on fossil fuel for its location, nourishment, health viability and preservation.

We are left to ponder a bleak outlook for humanity, awaiting us all on a very near horizon. I would campaign vigorously against all use of fossil fuels, if there was something to replace them.

Bill Waterhouse

Qualicum Beach

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