EDITORIAL: Deja vu all over again

Bigger picture regarding important issues gets lost in the digital age

The instant gratification digital age has detrimentally affected everyone’s ability to see the bigger picture, both as it relates to the past and the future.

Two current issues paint a picture of this myopic attitude.

Christy Clark is not the first premier to talk about how the process for the way government and teachers bargain is broken.

Somehow, because she has said it recently in this round of contentious bargaining, it becomes a new thing, like some kind of revelation. It is not.

The characters change in the premier’s office and at the top of the teachers’ union, but the same script is spoken every few years.

The facts are, enrolment is down in many jurisdictions, in some places dramatically, like Parksville Qualicum Beach. When the formula used to fund the system is based on per pupil numbers, the pot is smaller. It’s not rocket science.

The teachers also say, every time their contract comes up, they are fighting for the children and the level of their education. If they were only asking for smaller class sizes and a return of supports and enhancements like aides and librarians, that would be more believable.

The BCTF says the average salary of a teacher in B.C. is $71,485. While the BCTF is coy about its wage-increase demands, some reports indicate the BCTF is asking for 16 per cent over four years, 21.5 per cent if you work in the increased costs to benefits and reduced workload.

You can read the same phraseology, the same comments from both the government and the teachers, in any labour dispute between the parties for the past four decades. As Yogi Berra said, it’s deja vu all over gain.

Meanwhile, Island Health’s board of directors and president/CEO paid a visit to Parksville Qualicum Beach last week, and spoke about the lack of palliative care beds (there’s one) in the region like it was a new thing that they are tackling in a timely manner.

This is another decades-long issue that has been ignored for just as long by Island Health. Our region continues to be home to older and older people, increasing the need for palliative care beds.

These are not new issues. All of the parties involved should stop treating them as such, admit culpability and move to make real, systemic changes so we’re not talking about the same things in another 20 years.

— Editorial by John Harding

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Qualicum Beach soccer club assists young player in quest to attend elite European academy

Eagles donate $750 to Franks, who plans to further career in Portugal

WATCH: Berwick Qualicum Beach residents back with another music video

Residents and staff dance to ‘Drunken Sailor’ by The Irish Rovers

Virtual Qualicum school district meeting includes talk of return to class, masks and more

SD69 to hold town hall discussion featuring questions from parents

Qualicum Beach woman reunited with wedding ring she lost in Nanaimo

Woman ‘over the moon’ after getting ring back, say RCMP

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

TRAFFIC: Motor vehicle incident on Malahat north of Shawnigan Lake turnoff

Vehicle hanging on median, traffic may be impacted

Captain Horvat’s OT marker lifts Canucks to 4-3 win over Blues

Vancouver takes 2-0 lead in best-of-7 NHL playoff series with St. Louis

Garbage truck knocks down lamp post onto pickup in north Nanaimo

Emergency crews respond to Dickinson Crossing plaza mall Friday afternoon

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Taking dog feces and a jackhammer to neighbourhood dispute costs B.C. man $16,000

‘Pellegrin’s actions were motivated by malice …a vindictive, pointless, dangerous and unlawful act’

Racist stickers at Keremeos pub leaves group uneasy and angry

The ‘OK’ hand gesture is a known hate-symbol

Most Read