EDITORIAL: Get on with it

There’s no way to manufacture anything mixed about the message Monday night in Nanoose Bay.

There’s no way to manufacture anything mixed about the message Monday night in Nanoose Bay.

Approximately 300 people showed up for a public hearing regarding bylaws that would move forward a massive expansion of Nanoose though development on lands owned by Fairwinds near Schooner Cove and the Lakes District.

Thirty people took the microphone to speak at the public hearing; 29 of them spoke in glowing terms about what the developments will do for their community.

What’s more, they urged both the regional district and provincial government to provide approvals as expeditiously as possible for a project that’s been talked about for most of the last decade. The people have had their say. Perhaps most importantly, Nanoose First Nations’ concerns have been respected and Chief David Bob has expressed his people’s support for the project.

The unification of the people, especially when it wasn’t in opposition to something, seemed odd for a public hearing. When we walked into a room of 300 people who were there to talk about a major development, the last thing we would have suspected is uniform thinking.

But there was the message for both the directors of the regional district and the provincial government: get on with it.

There is a good argument that the system used for passing municipal bylaws is flawed. By the time proposals reach the public hearing stage, the opportunity for questioning elected officials on their view of the plan is over. There is no back and forth at a public hearing, no chance to put the feet of politicians to the fire.

However, there are many weeks before a bylaw gets to the public hearing stage where the public can quiz politicians and staff and make their case. And just because a politician doesn’t agree with a certain point of view in the end, it doesn’t mean he/she hasn’t listened.

There is, however, not much ambiguity in the Fairwinds case. The public wants regional district directors to move this forward and they want MLA Michelle Stilwell to help push it through the bureaucracy with reasonable speed.

Perhaps within three years, a Nanoose Bay senior citizen will be able to walk a short distance to get a few groceries before enjoying a glass of wine or cup of tea on a pub deck facing Georgia Strait, all near his/her reasonably-sized, properly-supported home. Ah, aging in place sounds civilized, does it not?

— Editorial by John Harding

Just Posted

Parksville seniors getting stronger with age

Weightlifting couple qualify to compete at Worlds Masters in Montreal in August

Camera captures cougar lurking in Parksville’s Foster Park neighbourhood

Resident shared photo to alert others to big cat’s presence

RDN tipping fees set to go up in July

The Regional District of Nanaimo is set to increase tipping fees at… Continue reading

Ballenas Whalers girls are crazy about rugby

Program has attracted close to 60 girls this season

Defiant vigil starts healing in New Zealand after massacre

Police say the gunman in the shooting that killed 50 acted alone

Facebook announces changes to political advertising to meet new federal rules

Bill C-76 bans the use of money from foreign entities to conduct partisan campaigns

National Arts Centre spotlights Indigenous and female artists in upcoming season

Other musical offerings include a salute to Canada’s Indigenous composers

Travel expected to be slowed by fallout from fire at Toronto’s Pearson airport

All U.S.-bound flights from Terminal 1 were cancelled Sunday night after the fire broke out near a security checkpoint

Trudeau fills vacancy in cabinet with B.C. MP Joyce Murray

Murray, 64, was elected in 2008 and served previously as a minister in B.C.’s provincial government

Leivo nets shootout winner as Canucks edge Stars 3-2

Schaller scores first 2 goals of season for Vancouver

Courtenay home a ‘writeoff’ after Sunday afternoon fire

Two occupants and one of a neighbouring home treated for minor smoke inhalation

UBC study shows honey bees can help monitor pollution in cities

Scientists analyzed beehives in high density urban areas to those off on Galiano Island

Most Read