EDITORIAL: It’s difficult to follow Justin Trudeau’s reasoning on pipelines

He supports the Keystone pipeline, doesn't support Northern Gateway and it seems he supports Kinder Morgan

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau seems to be in favour of Kinder Morgan’s plan to twin its pipeline. He is in favour of the Keystone XL project currently being poo-pooed by U.S. President Barack Obama. Trudeau is not in favour of the Northern Gateway pipeline project.

It’s difficult to follow the reasoning behind these stances from the man who wants to be prime minister. The three-point checklist for his approval, according to the Liberal Party of Canada website:

• does it get Canadian resources to market?

• is it environmentally responsible?

• does it have community approval?

All three pipelines pass on the first point, obviously.

The Kinder Morgan pipeline starts in Alberta and ends in Burnaby. You may remember the recent arrests related to Kinder Morgan’s exploratory work on Burnaby Mountain. Protesters from the community and elsewhere were dragged away from the mountain, claiming the pipeline has no support locally and is an environmental disaster waiting to happen, either through a potential rupture or through its contribution to the bigger picture of climate change.

What’s more, the City of Burnaby has officially announced its opposition to the pipeline.

Even if he could put a check mark beside “environmentally responsible” in regards to Kinder Morgan, how does Trudeau possibly check the box beside “community approval?”

It calls into question any and all of his stances related to pipelines. There’s really no sense to it. And it makes one wonder how someone who plays this fast and loose with his own policies would perform if it comes to pass that he is leading more than just his own party.

Trudeau’s stance on both Keystone (he’s in favour) and Northern Gateway (he’s opposed) is easily called into question when his apparent policy toward Kinder Morgan — it has been foggy at best, in our view — is considered.

We get that Prime Minister Stephen Harper is not exactly universally loved. Leaders seldom are after some time in office, and the word change, no matter how empty, can be a powerful motivator for the electorate. It should also be said it would not take much time to find inconsistencies in the policies of the Conservatives, either.

We do hope voters take some time to look a little deeper than the surface next year when it comes to choosing our next prime minister.

— Editorial by John Harding

Just Posted

Second delivery of building units for 222 Corfield in Parksville arrives March 21

Vehicles should expect intermittent single-lane alternating traffic

Public input sought on proposed cannabis retail store in Coombs

Application to be reviewed by Regional District of Nanaimo

Two nature-inspired artists display oil paintings at Qualicum gallery

Judy Maxwell and Lloyd Major depict scenes of wildlife, landscapes and the west coast

Five highlights in the 2019 federal budget

Latest budget includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum

Cougar on Island might have been shot with bow-and-arrow

Conservation officer service looking for animal near Port Alice

Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

The company is also paying about $5 million to cover plaintiffs’ legal fees and other costs

B.C. mosque part of open-house effort launched in wake of New Zealand shootings

The ‘Visit a Mosque’ campaign aims to combat Islamophobia

‘That’s a load of crap’: Dog poop conspiracy spreads in White Rock

Allegation picked up steam through a Facebook page run by a city councillor

Explosives unit brought in after suspicious boxes left at B.C. RCMP detachment

Nanaimo RCMP issues all clear after packages were found on lawn earlier in the day

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Newfoundland man caught after posting photo of himself drinking and driving

The 19-year-old took a photo of himself holding a beer bottle and cigarette while at the wheel

Carfentanil found in 15% of overdose deaths in January: B.C. coroner

Carfentanil is 100 times more powerful than illicit fentanyl and used to tranquilize elephants

Most Read