EDITORIAL: Sexing up politics

Liberal Party of Canada members in B.C. are considering some interesting policy planks

The federal Liberals have a policy resolution that says prostitution is a “legitimate service” that should be taxed “just like any other commercial enterprise.”

With the municipal election behind us and a provincial vote 30 months away, our political divining rod naturally dipped toward the federal election, which is scheduled for Oct. 19, 2015.

We suspect it will be difficult for candidates across the country to localize the federal election. Perhaps it’s fair to say the federal election really isn’t about local issues, although the ferry service being deemed an extension of the Trans Canada highway system sounds pretty pertinent to us as a local issue.

Does that mean it’s the candidates’ job to translate Ottawa to us, tell us what’s important and explain the stance of their parties on these issues?

Does anyone wonder why people are losing faith and interest in the political process?

We digress. Back to the Liberals. As we went looking for some federal election angle, we stumbled upon the Liberal Party of Canada’s (B.C. chapter) policy resolutions. They are not official campaign planks yet. And we didn’t just go cherry-picking to highlight this particular resolution — it’s number two on the Liberal’s 10 prioritized policies.

The preamble to the resolution is sound, logical stuff that speaks to the marginalization of the most vulnerable people in our society. It speaks about how limiting sex trade workers to the street puts them at a greater risk of human trafficking, assault, murder, and other violent and malicious crimes.

The resolution suggests the party will table a bill in the House of Commons ensuring sex trade workers are legally able to secure all materials and spaces required to run a safe and successful business, with a proper business licence.

In small-c conservative Parksville Qualicum Beach, we look forward to Liberal candidate Carrie Powell-Davidson translating this one to the masses.

Will she be forced, by the policy of her party, to encourage the councils of Qualicum Beach and Parksville to look favourably on business licence bylaw changes which will welcome facilities where people can safely pay for sex?

And to think we believed this federal election was going to be boring.

— Editorial by John Harding

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