EDITORIAL: The beholder’s eye

Albertans by and large are independent and believe in hard work. There isn't a hint of entitlement, and it's refreshing.

Vancouver Islanders might be rightfully accused of being a bit too smug.

We talk about our region’s beauty and weather like no one else in the country enjoys nice summers. We can be smug about the fact we don’t really need to carry an ice scraper in our vehicles, and our snow shovels can collect dust for years in the garage.

A drive to Edmonton and back can reveal much about the beauty of the rest of the province and Alberta, and it helps to lessen the smugness.

The mountains have their own majestic charm, something which most of us Islanders are familiar. Beyond that, in the foothills and prairies of the rest of Alberta, is a beauty and bustle we should not be so quick to dismiss.

Large fields of golden canola are beside other crops, and in the middle of these vast spaces one will often notice the bobbing of pumpjacks, pulling that black gold out of the ground.

Never far away is a lake, filled with boats towing laughing children on tubes or water skis and lined with cabins — Albertans know how to spend their money and have fun in a relatively short summer.

You can hardly swing a stick without hitting a golf course, and we’re not talking old-guy executive tracks — these courses will test the best of players.

While the weather is good and there’s no shortage of recreational opportunities, it is the spirit of the people that might be Alberta’s most inviting trait. Take the City of Fort Saskatchewan, just outside Edmonton, for example. Roughly 15 years ago it was a town of about 12,000 people. It now boasts more than 22,000 (roughly the same size as the combined population of Parksville and Qualicum Beach).

No longer do the people of The Fort have to travel to Edmonton to shop. For anything. With the growth has come services and shopping that allow the community to keep dollars at home. New community centres, pool, museums, theatres — it is a happening and seemingly happy place.

There is not much talk of unemployment or what the government needs to do for the people. They are independent and believe in hard work. There isn’t a hint of entitlement, and it’s refreshing.

We would never trade places — we enjoy and respect our little part of the world too much for that. But perhaps we should have more respect for the beauty, people and the spirit of our neighbours.

— Editorial by John Harding

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Parksville runner ready to raise funds for charity

Watson to run half-marathon with daughter Lauren

Parksville man arrested after stabbing incident at makeshift camp near city mall

Oceanside RCMP report 28-year-old man taken into custody without incident

Qualicum Beach councillor files court petition against the town

Official says response to Walker’s petition will be filed

Teachers to get 2 extra days to prepare for students’ return, now set for Sept. 10

Students will first start with orientation and learn rules of COVID-19 classroom policies

More charges laid against man accused of killing Red Deer doctor in walk-in clinic

Appearing before a judge, Deng Mabiour, 54, rambled about being sick and needing a doctor

Teen killer Kelly Ellard gets day parole extension, allowing up to 5 days at home

Ellard is serving a life sentence for the 1997 murder of 14-year-old Reena Virk

Andrew Scheer likely marking last day in House of Commons as Opposition leader

Today’s Commons sitting is one of two scheduled for August

Deaths feared after train derails amid storms in Scotland

Stonehaven is on the line for passenger trains linking Aberdeen with the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow

DFO says 5 aggrieved B.C First Nations were consulted on fisheries plan

Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations calls response ‘a sham,’ adding DFO never incorporates their views

VIDEO: B.C. community rallies to save snared eagle

Revelstoke climber scales tree to save the raptor

Lower Mainland woman gives birth on in-laws’ driveway

Frédérique Gagnon new son is appropriately named after Norse trickster god

Most Read