Gracious critique

I was surprised at the vitriolic tone of Gerald Marantz’ letter to the editor ‘Lunney’s beliefs are not ours’

I was surprised at the vitriolic tone of Gerald Marantz’ letter to the editor ‘Lunney’s beliefs are not ours’ (The NEWS, March 19).

While I believe in freedom of expression and freedom of speech, and many of the other freedoms that Canadians enjoy, surely, as a matter of courtesy, when making statements such as Marantz made, they should be backed up with supporting facts.

For example: When did James Lunney lie about his religious beliefs to his constituency and how they influence his political decisions? And as for the statement that “His delusional and supernatural hallucinations were a blatant abrogation of his duty to uphold our Charter of Rights and are insulting to this great nation’s ideals,” I ask the question: because a person is influenced by their religious beliefs does this mean that they are delusional and suffering from supernatural hallucinations, and as a consequence fail to uphold the Charter of Rights and Freedoms?

In our confused and dangerous world I am thankful that Lunney has the courage to apply his religious beliefs to his political life. He has not shelved what he believes in order to court favour with anyone. It is not always easy or acceptable to stand for Christian beliefs and principles and I applaud anyone who, often at personal cost, is prepared to be true to their well-thought-out and reasoned faith.

I am also reminded that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms does state that everyone has freedom of conscience and religion, and freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression. The Charter also refers to the fact that hate is not acceptable.

I do not expect Marantz, or anyone else to think or believe as I do, or as Lunney does, but when we do disagree let us express our differences in a manner that is gracious and worthy of respect.

Geoffrey DixonParksville

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