Minority parliament

All four main political parties have a critical role and a minority situation has the potential to provide better democracy in action.

I think that Canada’s needs would be best served with a minority parliament, of whatever constitution. All four main political parties have a critical role and a minority situation has the potential to provide better democracy in action, and to develop concessional maturity.

In no particular order, I list here what I believe are some of the strengths of the parties, moderated from the extremes that quite occasionally are so bothersome.

The Conservatives: principled and scrupulous attention to stability, order and to the objective critique of economic policies that are emerging in our changing and uncertain world, with engaged regard for security and stout defense of the essence of traditional values even as they modify in expression.

The NDP: deep roots in the high progressive ideals of social democracy, diplomacy, and peaceful cooperation needed in a world of much selfishness, conflict and excess, and devoted to the principles of equality and  fairness with oversight on the balance between sustainable development and the environment.

The Liberals: the present incarnation brings fresh vision for Canada, new energy and vigour to help set the stage for re-investment, green tech and innovation more suited to the changing nature of the times, and holding values that are honest, practical and well-thought out.

The Greens: offer keen-sighted and sound principles of economic growth combined with rightful resource stewardship so as to not further imperil the roots of life and ecology, trade-pact transparency and clear notions of truly democratic governance and social equality.

With a working minority government we can benefit also from all four parties working on behalf of us, not only themselves, and there seems to be a momentum towards proportional representation that when it comes may reduce the tyrannies of first-past-the-post false majorities that all too often fail to represent all Canadians equally, growing sometimes corrupt or stale.

Brian Bindon
Parksville

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