Reasons for optimism

It's not all gloom and doom on the District 69 economic front

There are definite signs of promise for the economic future of our district.

While private and public development is not a panacea for all economic stagnation, it’s an important and positive indicator. Of late, we have reported on more than a few announcements that boost our spirits:

— the public health centre being built just south of Parksville’s downtown core is already creating  good-pay contraction jobs and the staff who will fill this facility once it is open will be well paid.

— a sign of openness from Qualicum Beach council which told us, and more importantly anyone who may consider doing business there, that this beautiful town wants to retain its charm but will still listen to unique, out-of-the-current-box proposals. Sometimes perception is as important as reality.

— big things happening at Wembley Mall in Parksville. Save-On-Foods building a new store and a national icon, Canadian Tire, moving into the current Save-On-Foods store. Can you say loads of good jobs?

— Quality Foods adding to the new southern hub of Parksville started by the health centre with a new flagship store.

The direct and indirect positive effects of these projects and other residential, public and retail developments cannot be ignored. First and foremost is jobs. Employment breeds employment – if you have a good job at the health centre, for example, you will spend a good chunk of your pay cheque at local stores, which secures the jobs in those locations.

Without trying to be rude, we have to ask those who would be opposed to private, retail development this question: will you work at the bakery counter until you’re 100?

And to those who want to protect the environment, both locally and globally: is it not better to burn less fuel and shop locally?

 

Admittedly this a simple view, and there are many more factors to consider when looking at individual developments, but we ask that you allow us some basic optimism today.                   — editorial by John Harding