Suicide undignified

“Dignicide” is little more than a euphemism for state-complicit executions.

“Dignicide” is little more than a euphemism for state-complicit executions, especially in this country where all doctors who assist with suicides work for the state.

Often death does not meet us on our terms. Accidents happen; violence occurs; organ failure can be sudden and fatal. There is no guarantee of a dignified death and it is not something we have a right to. Denouncing government interference in your decision to commit suicide does not assume that this same government should condone it.

A recent parliamentary committee advised extending doctor-assisted death to mature children, the mentally ill and non-terminal patients. We used to, as a society, work toward preventing suicide, not facilitating it. Imagine now calling a suicide hot-line and having the operator suggest a good doctor who can help you end your life, as opposed to reassuring the distressed caller that their life still has meaning. Wow, wouldn’t that be dignified?

Legalizing doctor-assisted suicide comes with two inherent dangers. Eventually the controls you seek will be taken from you and the definition of dignity will be re-shaped to embrace the utilitarian at the expense of the humanitarian. A simple Google search will give you plenty of examples of both in districts which have moved in this direction.

Truthfully, a doctor should no more assist with suicide than a teacher should assist with ignorance or a lawyer assist with crime. I’m sure it happens on occasion, but it’s at odds with their dignified oaths.

John ChambersParksville

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