The majority rules

Resorts need to blend in and fit into what's already here

Prior Lake, on the outskirts of Victoria, was an eclectic, clothes optional, slice of nature enjoyed by a variety of people and their dogs.

With no beach, the large dock-deck was the focal point of relaxation between bouts of swimming.

While everyone engaged in conversation, reading, games of chess, backgammon and cards, the agreed upon rule was no audible music.  Personal listening devices and occasional guitar playing on the dock was great.

One day, a young man arrived with his boom box and was informed of the collective consensus to not have a dominant, amplified sound that would disturb the ambiance.

He scoffed, made a couple of comments and turned on his style of music.

An older man went over to him and asked him politely to to turn off his stereo or use headphones. Again the young man sneered remarks of non-compliance.

Finally, after another request was ignored, the older guy picked up the offending apparatus and heaved it into the dark, deep waters surrounding the idyllic retreat.

Anger welled up in the young man. And when he stood up to confront the older man, all the other guys lying on the dock stood up in solidarity to avoid any potential violence.

The young man removed himself from the scene and the established status quo resumed.

And now, Carrie Powell Davidson and the Parksville council are standing up to preserve our beach front area from commercial noise invasion versus the sounds of occasional recreational events.

If the Beach Club wishes to enhance a wedding party with music, then make it live, make it acoustic like a four string quartet.

The other resorts in question are not smack dab, front and centre on our waterfront.

Blend in. Let our oceanfront vacationland be enjoyed by all but keep your clothes on!

Once a precedent is set, who knows how far the decibels will rise? The majority rules.

Gord Byers

Parksville

 

 

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