Think about the long-term

Are we spending our grandchildren's inheritance? Actually, yes.

You’re probably seen at least one of them — the bumper sticker on a huge trailer or RV that reads, “I’m spending my grandchildren’s inheritance!”

It’s supposed to be  funny or clever or otherwise amusing, but it’s not. It’s not funny because, unfortunately, it’s true — not just of the person sporting the sticker, but also for most of the rest of us as well.

We’re burning their oil, polluting their water, spending their money and generally wrecking their planet — and they won’t thank us for it.

Back in 1992, the International Institute for Sustainable Development made a point of calling for governments to look down the road.

“We cannot simply think of our survival; each new generation is responsible to ensure the survival of the seventh generation. The prophecy given to us, tells us that what we do today will affect the seventh generation and because of this we must bear in mind our responsibility to them today and always.”

The idea of looking seven generations down the road is older than that, forming a key component of many First Nations spiritual practice and planning.

It’s an idea we should all be thinking about particularly hard these days as the climate continues to change and our leaders and the power structures that support them seem not only unable but entirely unwilling to do anything about it.

In fact, our current Canadian government is rolling back even the entirely insufficient measures that have been taken in a race to develop and export as much of Canada’s rich resource heritage as quickly as possible.

There’s a good reason for that of course. Our corporate culture demands the maximization of profit  and it demands it now. Future generations — those little tykes wearing the short pants on the tricycles in your own backyard — they don’t count for pretty much anything.

We should think about why that is and what we can do about it. We’re running out of time to make the changes they need.    — editorial by Neil Horner

 

Just Posted

Retired Nanoose Bay teacher ‘Set for Life’ after $675K lottery win

Shannon plans to buy new sails for his sailboat

Country music star Aaron Pritchett back in Qualicum Beach to play benefit concert

Singer to headline Thalassa restaurant fundraiser for Ronald McDonald house

Qualicum school district sees utility costs go down

Capital funding opportunities promote clean energy and drive efficiencies

Order in the chambers: Qualicum Beach votes for council code of conduct

Coun. Robert Filmer’s motion passes unanimously at town meeting

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Cross-examination begins for B.C. dad accused of killing young daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

Wife charged in husband’s death in Sechelt

Karin Fischer has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of her husband, Max

B.C. Hydro applies for rare cut in electricity rates next year

Province wrote off $1.1 billion debt to help reverse rate increase

Most Read