Town is simply going in for the kill over dog attack

There is no need to take such drastic action over a dog bite

Wasn’t the death penalty abolished in 1976?

(Qualicum Beach town Deputy Chief Administrative Officer) John Marsh has got it all wrong if he continues to push for the euthanizing of these two offenders. (Re: Town wants dogs destroyed, The News, page A6, Fri., Dec. 2 edition)

Sure, it would please a lot of nervous dog walkers who fear random attacks at any given moment, but the solution Marsh offers is nothing but a quick fix.

Not only is he punishing the wrong offender, but he is sending a message to the community that our leaders are not willing to seek superior solutions to issues that are not uncommon.

Dog attacks occur all the time, many with much more serious outcomes than this recent one, and by killing the animal that was active in the damage we are merely taping up an issue that requires heavy-duty construction.

First, the dogs are not wholly to blame for the incident.

Obviously they are animals that are not safe off-leash in public areas, and they should have been under strict control, but killing them is just as cruel as the attack they committed.

Euthanizing might make sense if they happened to be vicious beasts who couldn’t be safely approached without a suit of armor on, but there is no proof that these creatures even have a history of violence.

One strike and you’re out?

This seems like a panicked decision Marsh has made to save face and seem like some sort of hero, making quick decisions in a time of need. But upon closer investigation, it is obvious his solution is ridiculous.

Punishing the dogs isn’t going to do any good, they will be dead, their family will be devastated, and a troop of gentle, on-leash dog owners will be comforted, until the next incident occurs.

If Marsh had the insight and patience to sit down and think the problem over, he would see that his decision was an ignorant one. He would realize that, in a dog attack, a dog is not the one to blame.

Does one blame the vehicle in a fender bender or the person sitting behind the wheel, controlling the gas pedal?

Marsh should use his influence to come up with a way to punish the dog owner, whether it be through paying a fine or going to court, and persecute the body responsible for the incident, instead of the vehicle for disaster.

If he wracked his brain and thought just a little bit harder, Marsh might even realize he could take another step to aid in ending his quick-fix cycle.

He might come up with the idea of sending the dogs to a rehabilitation facility instead of ending their lives without trying to fix their issues.

Does a drunk driver get a lethal injection after a fatal accident? Or does he get sent to rehab to try and change, to try and prevent future accidents?

Perhaps Marsh thinks himself a hero, taking drastic measures to console us dog owners, quaking in our walking shoes, anticipating a violent attack.

But the truth is, instead of preventing such attacks, he is helping them to occur.

By killing these two dogs, showing the community he is willing to take impulsive action, Marsh isn’t protecting us. He is reaching down and slipping the leash off another vicious creature, and this one might just go in for the kill.

Madeleine Ritzker lives in Qualicum Beach

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Erin Haluschak visits the VI Free Daily/PQB News studio. (Peter McCully photo)
PQBeat: Erin Haluschak talks missing persons on Vancouver Island, women in media

Podcast: Black Press reporter also talks about importance of women in the media

(File photo)
Regional District of Nanaimo to increase fees for disposal of mattresses

Current rate of $15 per unit not enough to cover recycling

(The Canadian Press)
Trudeau won’t say whether Canada supports patent waiver for COVID-19 vaccines

‘Canada is at the table to help find a solution’

Gord Judson steers his log truck down a forest service road, using two-way radio and call signals to mark his position for oncoming traffic. (B.C. Forest Safety Council)
Planning some B.C. wilderness fishing? Don’t catch a log truck

Remote recreation areas bracing for heavy pandemic pressure

Former University of British Columbia student Stephanie Hale, 22. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff Bassett
Human Rights Tribunal to hear complaint against UBC Okanagan for ‘mishandling’ sexual assault report

Stephanie Hale did not return to campus after the student she alleges attacked her was cleared of wrongdoing

Jennifer Coffman, owner of Truffle Pigs in Field, B.C., poses beside her business sign on Thursday, May 6, 2021, in this handout photo. Her restaurant and lodge have been hit hard by a closure of a section of the Trans-Canada Highway and by the British Columbia government discouraging Alberta residents from visiting during the pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Jennifer Coffman, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
‘Why we survive’: B.C. boundary towns struggle without Albertans during pandemic

Jennifer Coffman’s restaurant is located in the tiny community of Field, which relies on tourism

NEW CUTLINE Payphone use is declining dramatically. (Black Press Files)

This payphone sits just east of TD Bank in Parksville, on Harrison Avenue. (Emily Vance photo)
Last call approaches for Vancouver Island payphones?

Some payphones don’t get used for days as mobile phones diminishing need

Garden centre manager Jack Olszewski and Chris Beaudoin say business has grown by 50 per cent at the Sooke Home Hardware Store. (Rick Stiebel - Sooke News Mirror)
Flower power: COVID restrictions fuel bloom boom on Vancouver Island’

More people seeking flowers to add colour, says Sooke landscaper

A sign indicating face coverings are required by the establishment is pictured on the front door of a business in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A sign indicating face coverings are required by the establishment is pictured on the front door of a business in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. to start releasing neighbourhood-specific COVID numbers after data leak

Documents obtained by the Vancouver Sun show cases broken down by neighbourhoods

Ladysmith RCMP safely escorted the black bear to the woods near Ladysmith Cemetary. (Town of Ladysmith/Facebook photo)
Black bear tranquillized, relocated after wandering around residential Ladysmith

A juvenile black bear was spotted near 2nd Avenue earlier Friday morning

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix update B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, April 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 case count creeps up, seven more deaths

445 people in hospital, 157 in intensive care

Most Read